Kibo awards second EPC power line contract for Mbeya Coal to Power

first_imgKibo Mining PLC, the multi-asset Africa-focused energy and resource company, announces that the Company has awarded SEPCO III, Kibo’s Chinese development partner, the second lot of the Engineering, Procurement and Construction (EPC) power contract involving the construction of the Power Line that will evacuate power from the Mbeya Power Plant in the Songwe District of Tanzania to the TANESCO Mbeya sub-station.Originating from the past four weeks’ intensive engagement with the Tanzania Electricity Supply Company (TANESCO) on the development of a Power Purchase Agreement (PPA) for the Mbeya Coal to Power Project (MCPP), the company met with SEPCO III at their Qingdao corporate headquarters to:Update SEPCO III on progress with PPA negotiations;Revalidate the existing EPC contract price for MCPP;Integrate and align PPA technical requirements with EPC-contract provisions; andDiscuss broader project development co-operation with the objective to expand the existing co-operation agreement to, amongst other matters, also include the company’s Mabesekwa project in Botswana.During the above referred meetings, the company and SEPCO III also decided that sufficient progress has been made with the PPA discussions and that it would be prudent to sign Lot 2 of the EPC-contract with SEPCO III. The power line construction contract is the second lot of the EPC contractual work as outlined in the announcement dated 29 August 2017. Kibo has a longstanding relationship with Chinese company SEPCO III for the development of the Mbeya Coal to Power Plant that is of key strategic importance in reducing Tanzania’s critical power deficit.Louis Coetzee, CEO of Kibo Mining, said: “We are delighted to continue working with SEPCO III as our designated EPC partner. The signing of this second lot of the EPC is the conclusion of discussions with SEPCO III that occurred last week in China, during which several strategic decisions were taken with regard to the further development of the MCPP as well as our future strategic co-operation with SEPCO III. Together with all our development partners we are working all hours to complete the PPA as soon as possible. Over the past few weeks we have once again been reminded of the significant importance of the MCPP, both as a strategic energy project as well as a socio-economic development project, and how critically important it is to spend enough time to make sure that we get it right the first time. The PPA process is in a very sensitive phase of its development and this requires the utmost patience, consideration and discretion from all stakeholders.”last_img read more

Google now has a form for those who want to be forgotten

first_imgEUROPEANS CAN REQUEST that Google ‘forgets’ about them from today.If follows a European Court of Justice ruling that individuals have the right to have links to information about them deleted from searches under certain circumstances, such as it being outdated or inaccurate.However, this only applies to websites being linked to from Google search results, and not the information on the website itself.For example, a link from Google to a webpage mentioning an individual could be blocked, but the webpage would still be accessible – just not from Google.To comply with the recent ruling, Google launched a webform available for Europeans to request the removal of results from the search engine.It asks those applying to identify who they are, which specific links they want removed from search results and why.Photo IDThose making requests must prove they are who they say they are by providing digital copies of a form of photo identification such as national identity cards or drivers’ licenses.They are also asked to electronically sign the request.Requests will be reviewed individually by someone at Google, and not handled by automated software.Google declined to estimate how long it might be until links begin disappearing, saying factors such as whether requests are clear cut will affect how long it takes.“We’re working to finalize our implementation of removal requests under European data protection law as soon as possible,” Google said in a note atop the web form.In the meantime, please fill out the form… and we will notify you when we start processing your request.The form explained that Google will look at whether the targeted results are in the public interest, such as information about financial scams, professional malpractice, criminal convictions or public misconduct by government officials.Google described the form as “an initial effort” and explained it will work with data protection authorities in the months ahead to refine the process.In an email to TheJournal.ie, a Google spokesperson saidThe court’s ruling requires Google to make difficult judgments about an individual’s right to be forgotten and the public’s right to know. We’re creating an expert advisory committee to take a thorough look at these issues. We’ll also be working with data protection authorities and others as we implement this ruling.”Analysts said the global impact of the ruling was not immediately clear, but that it could raise some tricky issues in Europe and beyond.Worries also arose that letting people edit their online histories could hamper investigative journalism.The case highlights growing concerns about so-called online reputation management, which has spawned an industry that helps eliminate or minimize damaging information online.- © AFP, 2014, additional reporting by Nicky RyanRead: Europe struck wrong balance on ‘right to be forgotten’ ruling, says Google boss >More: 8 Google search trends that prove Ireland’s glory days are truly over >last_img read more