What Steven Hauschka Thinks About Being A Clutch Kicker

After wrapping up my “Kickers Are Forever” article on Tuesday, I wandered to Media Day in Phoenix, site of a sporting event this Sunday, and found Seattle Seahawks kicker Steven Hauschka, who — unlike a certain beastly teammate — was willing to answer a few questions.Here’s how it went down, starting with what they were talking about just before I arrived:Another reporter: Can you imagine Lionel Messi or Cristiano Ronaldo kicking field goals in the Super Bowl? Do you think they would be good?Steven Hauschka: Yeah, I think Ronaldo would be really good at it. They both would. It’s a little different but I’m sure within a few minutes they could be kicking 50-yard field goals, no problem.Benjamin Morris: Do you know how to bend a soccer ball?SH: Yeah.BM: What’s the longest field goal you’ve ever made in practice?SH: 67 [yards].BM: How often do you think you convert a field goal of 60 yards?SH: In Arizona, I don’t know. Half the time or more.BM: Why do you think kickers are so good these days?SH: Because we grew up kicking. I started kicking at 3 years old. I think it’s just, we’re more athletic. I mean, not me in particular, but some of the guys out there in the league are just really good athletes who switched to kicking because they couldn’t make it as a quarterback or something.BM: Do you think soccer has improved it a lot?SH: Yeah, yeah I do. Most of the guys started playing soccer that ended up as kickers.BM: Do you think punters have gotten better as much as field goal kickers have gotten better?SH: I think some of the punters have gotten really good, but as a whole I don’t think they’re at the level of the field-goal kickers. I think there’s more put into the field goal at a younger age. I don’t think kids start learning to punt until a little later. Whereas field goal kicking, I think guys are starting pretty young.BM: What are the odds that an average NFL player, non-kicker, could make a 25 yard field goal?SH: Um, low. Twenty-five percent.BM: Do you think there’s such a thing as clutch?SH: I think if you’re a 90 percent kicker, the best you can do under the most important situation is be a 90 percent kicker. I think if you’re trying to stretch any more than that … that’s not realistic. Obviously the clutch guys make it when it matters, but there’s still that chance.BM: If you miss a kick, do you feel bad about it? Or do you feel like, if you’re 90 percent, you’re going to miss one in 10 kicks?SH: Yeah, that’s the goal: to understand that it’s going to happen every once in a while because no one is perfect. The goal is consistently to play at a high level.Some thoughts:That last one may read like a fairly bland answer, but his tone reminded me of how a lot of professional poker players ideally feel about losing: that losing is part of the process. But in reality that ideal is very hard to meet.He obviously has a very high opinion of soccer, saying an average NFL player (who has presumably been handling footballs his whole life) could make a short field goal only 25 percent of the time, but top soccer players could make 50-yarders with only minutes of practice. The introduction of the soccer-style kick and the influx of former soccer players into gridiron kicking ranks are both likely contributors to kickers’ otherworldly improvement.His answer about “clutchness” seemed to suggest that trying too hard to be clutch could be counter-productive relative to just trying to kick the ball. That fits with one of my pet theories of clutch, which is that, rather than being some kind of superhuman ability, clutch just means being completely normal in circumstances when others might crack.Here’s hoping that kicking plays a big role in Sunday’s game! read more

Disappointing day for Shaunae Bahamas Gold medalist misses medal in London

first_img Related Items:#magneticmedianews, #Shaunae4thaftercrampingatIAAF2017 Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp#United Kingdom, August 9, 2017 – London – What a disappointment for our Shaunae Miller-Uibo tonight in London as she finished fourth after cramping up in the final 40m of a race she was winning at the IAAF World Championships.    Miller-Uibo was among the stars running in the rain in a tough field of competitors and our Olympic gold medalist appeared to be getting the job done, when all of a sudden a cramp allowing three others to pass as Miller-Uibo’s dreams of gold at the Championships in the 400m were dashed.It was an amazing performance in that losing effort.. first went to Phyllis Francis of the USA, Salwar Eid Naser of Bahrain ends up with silver and placing third, legendary American sprinter, Allyson Felix.    Up to news time, we were unable to find any reactions to the event by Shaunae.#MagneticMediaNews#Shaunae4thaftercrampingatIAAF2017last_img read more

San Diego DA Summer Stephan announces new initiatives to train officers for

first_imgSan Diego DA Summer Stephan announces new initiatives to train officers for mental health crisis calls DA @SummerStephan Announces De-Escalation Training & Mental Health Reform Blueprint to improve public safety outcomes when individuals w/ mental health challenges come into contact w/ police & the criminal justice system: https://t.co/XCOJmVLQUw @NAMISanDiego @SanDiegoCounty pic.twitter.com/MOgix7E1nK— SD District Attorney (@SDDistAtty) May 21, 2019 Categories: Health, Local San Diego News Tags: Summer Stephan FacebookTwitter May 21, 2019 Updated: 9:51 AM Posted: May 21, 2019 KUSI Newsroom 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) – The San Diego County District Attorney’s Office announced $1.5 million in funding Tuesday to go toward increased police training on interacting with individuals suffering from mental illnesses.The initiative seeks to offer enhanced training to all police officers in the county within the next three years, providing strategies for how best to recognize the signs of mental illness or substance abuse when responding to emergency calls.Officers already receive training regarding mental health issues in the police academy, but Escondido Police Chief Craig Carter said the new training curriculum offers “more tools to cope with those in crisis while we’re in the field.” Officials hope the new curriculum — the culmination of a year-long collaboration involving more than 200 experts on mental health, substance abuse and criminal justice issues — will reduce to need for officers to use deadly force in the field.The new training includes classes led by members of the Psychiatric Emergency Response Team — or PERT — who often assist police officers responding to emergency calls related to mental health crises.The funding will also go toward use of the MILO Range Theater, a video simulation that places officers in a variety of situations replicating potential interactions with subjects suffering from mental illnesses.In addition, a 911 Mental Health checklist has been created to give family members calling 911 an opportunity to inform police dispatchers of a loved one’s mental health issues, access to weapons and other important information, which “will allow officers to be more prepared before they arrive on scene,” according to District Attorney Summer Stephan.The checklist, available on printed flyers, will be distributed to psychiatric hospitals, jails, police agencies and will soon be available on a free phone app.Dispatchers will also be trained to inquire further on mental health related issues when taking 911 calls.According to Stephan, county law enforcement responded to more than 53,000 calls for service last year for people with mental health issues. Subjects with mental health or substance abuse issues also accounted for 79% of the county’s officer-involved shootings over the past 25 years, she said, while around 30% of county jail inmates receive medication for mental health disorders.“Individuals in San Diego County facing mental health issues frequently come in contact with law enforcement and with our criminal justice system,” Stephan said. “Too often, the outcome falls short of helping people who face those challenges.”The recommendations that led to the new funding are included in a 76- page report released Tuesday, titled “Blueprint for Mental Health Reform: A Strategic New Approach Addressing the Intersection of Mental Health, Homelessness and Criminal Justice in San Diego County.”Summer Stephan’s complete press conference is below.The full report can be viewed at https://www.sdcda.org/Content/Preventing/Blueprint%20for%20Mental%20Health%20Re form.pdf . KUSI Newsroom, last_img read more

Uncle of DC Woman in Viral Violent Bus Smashing Video Speaks Out

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