Jamestown’s ‘Turn the River Green for St. Patrick’s Day’ Event Canceled

first_imgImage by Justin Gould/WNYNewsNow.JAMESTOWN – The Chautauqua County Chamber of Commerce says due to the Governor’s ban on events larger than 500 people the annual ‘Turn the River Green for St. Patrick’s Day’ event, which was scheduled for this Saturday at the Riverwalk in Jamestown, has been canceled.Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img

Global coal-fired generating capacity declined for first time in first half of 2020

first_imgGlobal coal-fired generating capacity declined for first time in first half of 2020 FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Bloomberg:Global coal-fired power capacity edged down for the first time on record in the first half of 2020 as retirements accelerated and the coronavirus saw new projects put on hold.The closing of plants, especially in Europe and the U.S., outpaced the start of new units, more than 60% of which were in China, according to a report by Global Energy Monitor. The net decline of 2.9 gigawatts may be small, at just over 0.1% of the world’s coal generation capacity, but marks a turning point in the burning of the dirtiest fossil fuel to produce electricity.“The Covid pandemic has paused coal plant development around the world and offers a unique opportunity for countries to reassess their future energy plans and choose the cost-optimal path, which is to replace coal power with clean energy,” said Christine Shearer, program director for coal at Global Energy Monitor.As developed economies in Europe and North America increasingly shift toward cleaner energy sources, mining companies are looking to fast-growing Asian countries to shore up demand for the heavy polluting fossil fuel. Still, world coal demand is set for its biggest annual drop since World War II as economic activity plunges due to coronavirus lockdowns, the International Energy Agency said in April.The pace of new construction in Asia is slowing, with countries including Bangladesh and Vietnam considering restricting or deferring new coal plants, according to Global Energy Monitor, which gathers information from public sources, such as media articles, and non-government agencies.China’s coal power expansion would exacerbate overcapacity, according to the report, which cited a study from the University of Maryland that projected the average utilization rate for the country’s coal plants could drop to 45% by 2025.[James Thornhill]More: Global coal power falls for first time even as China builds morelast_img read more

CDC: H1N1 spreads about as readily as seasonal flu

first_img Early in Mexico’s H1N1 epidemic, some studies suggested that each person sick with the new virus was spreading it to many others, Jernigan said. Transcript of May 20 CDC news briefinghttp://www.cdc.gov/media/transcripts/2009/t090520.htm However, “The more we look at it here in the United States, what we’re seeing is the attack rates really coming in at about what we would see with seasonal influenza,” Jernigan said. At a news briefing, Dr. Daniel Jernigan, deputy director of the influenza division at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), said it appears that the new virus has about the same attack rate as seasonal flu. The attack rate is the proportion of people who come down with the illness after being exposed to someone who has it. See also: May 20, 2009 (CIDRAP News) – A federal influenza expert said today that the novel H1N1 flu virus seems to spread at about the same rate as seasonal flu viruses do, even though much of the population is believed to have little or no immunity to the virus. From the studies so far, the transmission both within households and within communities seems to be about the same as with seasonal flu, he said. In other comments, Jernigan said the production of this year’s seasonal flu vaccine is nearly complete. He added that the CDC still hopes to have candidate H1N1 viruses ready to send to manufacturers at the end of this month for use in the possible production of H1N1 vaccines. He said older people most likely were exposed to H1N1 viruses—distant cousins of the new virus—before 1957, “and there’s a possibility that having exposure to that virus many years ago may allow you to have some reaction to the new H1N1 that’s now circulating.” Jernigan said it’s not yet known just how much protection older people may have. He added that the CDC will be reporting in more detail on the topic in an upcoming issue of Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. May 6 CIDRAP News story “Fewer senior swine flu cases may hint at protection” Jernigan also commented on the possibility that older people have some protection against the new virus because of exposure to H1N1 viruses decades ago. In a report earlier this week, a World Health Organization advisory group said older adults were shown to have neutralizing antibodies to the new virus. Jernigan said this statement in the report was probably based in part on CDC serology studies. “From a policy standpoint, we expect this to be spreading the same as we would see with seasonal influenza, but again, remember that a larger portion of the population may have absolutely no immunity or any protection for this one, which is different than what would happen through normal seasonal influenza,” Jernigan added.last_img read more