A fresh view of regeneration

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

H-DNL soccer: Fortuna girls handle business, Arcata boys win big

first_imgSarah Killfoil knotted up the game and then gave her Huskies their … Girl’s soccer: Fortuna (9-0, 4-0) 5 McKinleyville (2-5-1, 2-3-1) 2Fortuna High erased an early 2-0 deficit to down McKinleyville 5-2 Tuesday evening on the road at the home of Panthers.McKinelyville’s Soffia Reyes struck twice in the early moments of Tuesday’s match, putting the Panthers ahead 2-0 in the 17th minute.From there, it was all Fortuna.Aubrie Hall got Fortuna on the board with a goal in the 19th minute.last_img read more

Twenty years of freedom

first_imgNelson Mandela and FW de Klerk receivethe Nobel Peace Prize in 1993 for theirefforts to bring peace to South Africa.(Image: FW de Klerk Foundation) De Klerk and Mandela at the WorldEconomic Forum, Davos, in 1992.(Image: World Economic Forum) MEDIA CONTACTS • Danny GoulkanMarketing and communications, NHC+27 11 482 9573 or +27 72 952 2260RELATED ARTICLES• Long walk immortalised in bronze• Drawing on Madiba’s influence• Mandela Day now a global event• Tutu, De Klerk to children’s aidJanine Erasmus“I wish to put it plainly that the government has taken a firm decision to release Mr Mandela unconditionally. I am serious about bringing this matter to finality without delay.”With those words, said on 2 February 1990, then-state president FW de Klerk set a remarkable chain of events in motion. An electorate that, to a large extent, was enjoying the right to vote for the first time in their lives, led to a democratic South Africa with one of the most progressive constitutions in the world.De Klerk, who had assumed the presidency just four months earlier, wasted no time in bringing about long-overdue change.He was making his inaugural State of the Nation address at the 1990 opening of Parliament in Cape Town, speaking before the House and to a television audience.South Africa will mark the 20th anniversary of Nelson Mandela’s release from more than 27 years of imprisonment at the opening of Parliament on 11 February.The 2010 event will also be significant as it will be the first time the State of the Nation address is delivered in the evening. By arranging the speech for a more convenient television time, rather than the traditional morning delivery, the government is encouraging more citizens to tune in.Understanding through dialogueAddressing the nation in 1990, De Klerk went on to say that the agenda for negotiation was now open. He invited “sensible” leaders to come forward and begin talking, so that an understanding may be reached through dialogue.De Klerk’s government had a number of firm goals in mind, among them a new democratic constitution; protection of minorities and the rights of the individual; an independent, unbiased judiciary; religious freedom; better housing, education, social and health services for all; and a strong economy.This could only be achieved with the abolition of apartheid laws and restrictions, a fact of which De Klerk was very well aware.Not only did the president decide to release Mandela, he implemented other changes on a scale that nobody had anticipated.Several political parties were unbanned. These were the African National Congress (ANC), the Pan Africanist Congress, and the South African Communist Party. He also lifted restrictions on 33 other opposition groups. Prisoners who were in jail merely for belonging to one of the banned organisations were pardoned immediately.De Klerk also lifted certain media, education and security restrictions, paving the way for the eventual lifting of the latest state of emergency, by then in place since 1985. The death penalty was suspended and the controversial and deplorable Land Act was repealed.The remaining apartheid laws were dismantled over the next three years, and South Africa’s first democratic election took place in 1994. It was no surprise that Mandela stepped into the role of leader of the nation.Peace and reconciliationThe country had endured tension and violent conflict for decades, said De Klerk, and it was time to break out of that cycle and strive for peace and reconciliation. The silent majority yearned for it, he said, and the youth deserved it.De Klerk was emphatic in urging South Africans to come to the negotiation table. “On the basis of numerous previous statements there is no longer any reasonable excuse for the continuation of violence. The time for talking has arrived and whoever still makes excuses does not really wish to talk.”His decisive actions, which would eventually cut short his own political career as he made way for a new party to take over the government, earned him the praise of the nation, and the world.Archbishop Emeritus Desmond Tutu, speaking to the press at the time, exclaimed: “What he said has certainly taken my breath away … give him credit, man.”The BBC reported then-US president George Bush as saying that he welcomed the decision to dismantle apartheid, although more had to be done before the US would lift its economic sanctions. And Margaret Thatcher, then prime minister of Britain, wrote a congratulatory letter to De Klerk.Others, such as current UN secretary-general Perez de Cuellar and presidents Mario Soares of Portugal, Francois Mitterand of France, and Kenneth Kaunda of Zambia, also expressed their joy and approval.Some were more cautious. The late ANC president Oliver Tambo, speaking from Stockholm where he was receiving treatment for a stroke, described De Klerk’s steps as progressive, but pointed out that two of the ANC’s main demands were not fully realised – the release of all political prisoners, and the complete lifting of the state of emergency.Long-awaited releaseNelson Mandela was released on 11 February 1990 from the low-security Victor Verster prison, now known as the Drakenstein Correctional Centre, in the Dwars River valley near Paarl, Western Cape.Mandela had been relocated from Robben Island to the maximum-security Pollsmoor Prison in Cape Town’s southern suburbs in 1984, and a few years later he was moved to a private house within the prison walls of Victor Verster.“When he built a home in Qunu after his release,” said Mandela’s daughter Zindzi, “he insisted that it be a duplicate of his house in Victor Verster, where he felt comfortable. My father often said that he missed his time in prison because it allowed him time to reflect.”Zindzi Mandela received news of her father’s imminent release while she was at the funeral of her partner Clayton Sithole, who died while in detention at the former John Vorster police station, Johannesburg, in January 1990, just 12 days before Mandela walked free.She described the day of her father’s release as emotional, painful and chaotic. “I was terrified. There were so many people, which I never expected. As much as I wanted him to come home as a father, I knew he would come back as a leader first. And I was in mourning for the father of my child.”Straight after his release Mandela addressed thousands of supporters from the balcony of the Cape Town city hall. He spent his first night of freedom at Bishopscourt, the official residence of the Archbishop of Cape Town, who at that time was Desmond Tutu.Mandela flew to Johannesburg the next day, where he attended a rally at Soweto’s FNB stadium, now the impressive Soccer City and venue for the opening match of the 2010 Fifa World Cup. From there he went to his house in Vilakazi Street, Soweto, where he spent his first night at home in almost three decades.In 1993 De Klerk and Mandela jointly received the Nobel Peace Prize for their work in abolishing the apartheid policies that had held South Africa back for so long. The Nobel Committee awarded this prestigious honour “for their work for the peaceful termination of the apartheid regime, and for laying the foundations for a new democratic South Africa”.The laureates also jointly received the 1991 Unesco Félix Houphouët-Boigny Peace Prize.The announcement of the latter prize, made by former US Secretary of State Henry Kissinger, read: “For their contribution to international peace, to encourage them to continue in their effort and as a tribute to what they have done to educate their people towards an understanding and towards an overcoming of prejudice that many would not have thought possible a few short years ago.”Bringing the struggle to lifeIn February 2009 the National Heritage Council announced the first site in the new National Liberation Heritage Route (LHR) – the house at Victor Verster prison where Mandela spent the last few years of his incarceration.Making the announcement, CEO of the National Heritage Council Sonwabile Mancotywa said that the prison had transformed from a place of pain to one that honoured the final stretch in the struggle for freedom. “It is a place of history that has contributed to South Africa’s cultural revival,” said Mancotywa.Mandela’s former wife Winnie Madikizela, also in attendance, expressed her pleasure that the LHR was going all out to recognise the country’s struggle heroes: “We hope that it can include the history of all those who gave up their lives for freedom,” she said, “and tell the story of the Tambos and the Sisulus and others as much as the Mandela story has been told.”The South African LHR, a network of historically valuable sites that reflects key aspects of the country’s struggle for freedom, is modelled on the Australian convict sites. In July 2007 it was submitted to Unesco for nomination as a world heritage site, and is currently on the tentative list.The route consists of a host of stops that cover critical aspects of the liberation struggle, such as the women’s movement, youth and student movements, massacres and assassinations, and sites of historical significance.A few examples are Constitution Hill, once a notorious prison and now seat of South Africa’s Constitutional Court; Sharpeville, site of the massacre in 1960 where 69 protesters died; the Isandlwana battlefield, where Zulus and British colonial troops faced off in 1879; and Olive Schreiner House in De Aar, Northern Cape, once the home of the renowned author of The Story of an African Farm and opponent of women’s oppression.The Mandela section of the route includes his birthplace Mvezo in Mthatha, Eastern Cape province; Qunu in Mthatha where he grew up; the Clarkebury Institution which schooled him; the house in Alexandra, Johannesburg, where he lived for three years in the early 1940s; Fort Hare University; the site in Howick where he was captured by police in 1962; Liliesleaf Farm; Robben Island; Victor Verster prison; and the Mandela family home in Vilakazi Street, where Winnie lived with their children while he was in prison.It is hoped that other countries in the Southern African Development Community will make similar submissions.last_img read more

Young African leaders sought for US fellowship

first_img2 October 2015 Young African leaders who are interested in gaining skills training in the United States, are encouraged to apply for the 2016 Mandela Washington Fellowship.The Mandela Washington Fellowship for Young African Leaders, opened in 2014, is the flagship programme of President Barack Obama’s Young African Leaders Initiative (Yali). The latter seeks to empower young people through academic coursework, leadership training, and networking.Yali was launched in 2010 to support young African leaders as they spur growth and prosperity, strengthen democratic governance, and enhance peace and security across Africa. According to its website, applications for the fellowship are open from 1 to 31 October. Those who apply must have leadership qualities and demonstrate knowledge, interest and professional experience in public service, business and entrepreneurship, or civic engagement.These young leaders must also have the desire to plough back into the continent what they have learned abroad.The FellowsWatch former Fellows talk about how the initiative has changed their lives:The Fellows, who are between the ages of 25 and 35, have established records of accomplishment in promoting innovation and positive change in their organisations, institutions, communities, and countries. In 2015, Fellows represented all 49 countries in Sub-Saharan Africa; half of them were women, and it was the first time 76% of them spent substantial time in the US.US activitiesAcademic and leadership institutesEach Mandela Washington Fellow takes part in a six-week academic and leadership institute at a US university or college in one of three tracks: business and entrepreneurship, civic leadership, or public management. In 2016, there will be a pilot institute on energy.Presidential summitFollowing the academic component of the fellowship, the Fellows visit Washington DC for a presidential summit featuring a town hall with Obama. During the three-day event, Fellows take part in networking and panel discussions with US leaders from the public, private, and non-profit sectors.Professional development experienceFollowing these components, 100 Fellows are selected to remain in the US to participate in a six-week professional development experience programme with US non-governmental organisations, private companies, and governmental agencies that relate to their professional interests and goals.Watch how Fellows work in partnership with international companies to bring change:For more information on this initiative, read more here.Source: YoungAfricanLeadersInitiative and SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

How to prepare yourself for an investor: a guide

first_imgA recent survey found that many South African entrepreneurs needed help with things such as business planning. Find out more about how to prepare yourself for an investor, here.The Real State of Entrepreneurship in South Africa 2017 survey finds that some entrepreneurs do not know where to go for funding. There are various sources of funding, such as angel investors and crowdfunding. (Image: Brand South Africa)Brand South Africa reporterFunding is one of the challenges faced by many entrepreneurs in South Africa. In the Real State of Entrepreneurship in South Africa 2017 survey, many entrepreneurs indicated that they required education specific to the practicalities of running a business such as marketing support and business planning.According to the Seed Academy, which conducted the survey, there were more than 1,200 respondents this year. In addition, to deepen its insight into the true state of entrepreneurship in South Africa, the survey expanded its scope from start-ups to all entrepreneurs at any stage of business development.It was found that 18% of respondents had attempted to get funding from banks or development funding institutions such as the Industrial Development Corporation or the Department of Trade and Industry.“Some entrepreneurs indicated that they simply didn’t know where to go for funding, especially in light of the fact that most early-stage business funding requirements are below the R100,000 threshold,” said Donna Rachelson, CEO of Seed Engine, which incorporates the Seed Academy and the WDB Seed Fund. This is the third annual survey the Academy has conducted.Here are some learnings to prepare yourself before you approach an investor for funding:The different types of fundingOnline publication Entrepreneur Magazine lists the different forms of funding as angel investment, funding from a bank, crowdfunding, funding for previously disadvantaged individuals, and bootstrapping.Angel investment is when a wealthy professional provides you with start-up capital in exchange for equity in the business or a fixed percentage interest on the loan. Angel investors can be individuals or can be part of an angel network, to distribute risk.Bank funding depends on the different types of loans available and which kind is best suited to your needs. You need to provide a full set of financials and a comprehensive business plan for the bank officials to examine.Crowdfunding is similar to angel investment, but many individuals may pledge different amounts to the business in exchange for equity, interest or other more creative returns. There are South Africans platforms for crowdfunding: startme.co.za, thundafund.com and crowdfunding.co.za. You can also try international crowdfunding platforms such as kickstarter.com, indiegogo.com and rockethub.com.Funding for previously disadvantaged individuals can be in the form of a grant, loan or tender, which is given to previously disadvantaged people who have small businesses.Bootstrapping means starting and growing your business without any external help.Essential elements an investor wantsMarketability, sustainability and the business owner’s passion for the project were the essential elements that would interest an investor, said Gerrie van Biljon, executive director of Business Partners. He told the online business network SME Toolkit South Africa that entrepreneurs should prepare a concise story around their business idea.Van Biljon also advised that the entrepreneur know every detail of their idea and business plan. “Your value proposition should come through succinctly – what are you offering to whom, and why will they be prepared to buy it.”Useful documents for preparing your business planDownload the Industrial Development Corporation’s guidelines on how to prepare a business plan; or download the Seed Academy’s Essential Guide to Funding, or download the Yali Network’s business plan checklist.Experts on what investors wantTafadzwa Madavo, business development manager at Riversands Incubation Hub, told SME South Africa that if entrepreneurs were looking for funding, they should test their ideas first. “They call it a minimal viable product. Don’t look at getting a R1-million for a concept you haven’t even tested.”Robynne Erwin, operations manager of FinFind, agreed with this sentiment. “If you are still at the ideas stage, you need to be aware of the fact that ideas are considered to be cheap. [It] only gets a value when you have taken a step to make it real.”Andrew Louw, CEO of +Louw, advised that the entrepreneur must be able to explain their idea simply and easily in 30 seconds or less. “Focus on the things you can do easily without raising funding. Also, bootstrap as far as you can without needing to raise extra capital.”Watch the three experts give more advice, here:Speaking to the University of Pretoria’s Gordon Institute of Business Science, social entrepreneurs unpacked lessons they had learned when approaching investors.Pat Pillai, founder of Lifeco UnLtd, said the fundraising secret was to always trade for change. “Whether it is an investor, or it is someone who pays you a fee to make sure you grow young entrepreneurs in the most deserving and unprivileged part of our country, there’s always a report back on a return.”Sharanjeet Shan, founder of the Maths Centre, said that clarity and conviction about who you were and what you wanted to do was important. “If you’re not talking from the gut, it’s not going to work.”She added: “Why should I invest money in these people? I’m investing money because somebody’s life is going to change. If one person’s life changes, the lives of their community and the people around them change.”Stacey Brewer, co-founder of the Spark School, said she had learned that you should not change your mission nor your vision based on funding. “Believe in what you are and keep going, keep going.”Gregory Maqoma, founder of the Vuyani Dance Theatre, explained the conversation he had with his funders: “I allow them to understand the vision.“I also allow them to understand where we’re going — we talk about a five-year strategy. So, it’s a long term commitment rather than just focusing on a project. We align ourselves with what is desirable in terms of the space that we are serving.”His company was contributing to a bigger picture. “We can also be in a position where we can say it’s not only serving the community directly affected by the Vuyani Dance Theatre but it’s also about influencing policy; it’s about influencing change on a bigger platform, on a bigger scale.”Watch the video here:Know the term ‘due diligence’?You should educate yourself about due diligence if you are on the hunt for funding for your business, or if you are hoping to work with the government or with bigger companies as a supplier.SME South Africa explained that small and medium enterprises underwent due diligence when an investor evaluated the business as a potential investment opportunity, or a buyer was looking to acquire the enterprise.“Due diligence is a process where a business owner investigates the organisation based on their needs or requirements. The investigation can be legal, financial or anything that the business owner wants to evaluate before they contract themselves,” it reported.Learn more about how “due diligence” works, here.Sources: SME Toolkit South Africa, Entrepreneur Magazine, SME South Africa, Industrial Development Corporation, the YALI Network, and Seed Engine.Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

Kids More Likely to Own a Cellphone Than a Book, Study Finds

first_imgchris cameron Tags:#mobile#web Related Posts Role of Mobile App Analytics In-App Engagement What it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech …center_img Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces As technology becomes more a part of our day-to-day lives, some are worried that it is stunting the education of children by taking away time from activities like reading. A startling discovery from the London-based National Literacy Trust finds that children are more likely these days to own a cell phone than they are a book. The study, which NLT will publish next week, ties cell phone penetration to the presence of books in a child’s home, but are these conclusions fair to draw?A survey of 17,000 U.K. children between the ages of 7 and 16 found that while 86% owned a cell phone, only 73% said they owned a book. The NLT believes a child’s access to books has a direct effect on their reading ability, finding that 80% of children reading at their expect levels have their own books. Conversely, the same can only be said for just 58% of children not reading up to par with their age group.“Our research illustrates the clear link with literacy resources at home and a child’s reading ability,” said Jonathan Douglas, Director of the NLT. “By ensuring children have access to reading materials in the home and by encouraging children to love reading, families can help them to do well at school and to enjoy opportunities throughout their life.” The connection between books and cell phones in the hands of children is a strange one for the NLT to make. In the press release announcing the study, NLT does not define what they consider to constitute “owning a book,” – a significant factor that could change the way readers interpret the study. There are, however, ways to help the literacy problems by taking advantage of the popularity of mobile devices.While children certainly seem more interested in chatting with friends on their phones than sitting quietly and reading a book, some argue that this debate shouldn’t become about the media which children consume. Teacher and education blogger Vicki Davis told ReadWriteWeb that she believes kids benefit from reading on phones or computers as much as they do from paper.“Whether on a mobile phone, iPod, Kindle, or handheld device or paper – the medium should be irrelevant. The important thing is that students can read and write, or in this case read and text,” said Davis. “If ancient man had demanded that their children continue to use their tools – we would still be looking for cave walls to draw upon – paper has been an essential tool of the mass-produced industrial age and electronics are the essential produce of the interconnected information age. Education needs to wake up and harness these tools for learning!”Redefining “Reading”Michelle Manafy, editorial director at Information Today, says older generations need to open up their definitions of what “books” actually are. “The very notion of literacy and reading itself has evolved beyond the capacity of many who grew up with linear reading experiences to understand,” she says.“If every kid has a phone, then maybe we need to be looking much harder at creating content optimized for this reading environment, to creating a reading experience that coincides with their voracious appetite and shorter attention spans, with their tangentially and serendipitously connected non-linear reading style and socially mediated tastes,” said ManafyMobile technology blogger Jason Harris agrees with Davis and Manafy, and adds that the drop in reading skills are likely due to a combination of factors.“The world is changing in that mobile phones are falling into the hands of new populations, including young children,” said Harris. “Of course, there’s a competition for time in this age group, so if they’re on their mobile phones then all leisure activities, including reading, will take a hit. But are reading scores falling because of this one factor? I doubt it.”Are Parents to Blame?Marnie Webb, co-CEO of TechSoup Global says the technology is not to blame for the decline in reading skills. As she puts it, the onus is on the parents to make sure the kids have the same access to books as they do phones.“It doesn’t have to be an either or. We can’t make it an either or,” says Webb. “But that seems to me to be up to grownups […] I have to put the books in the kid’s pocket. Just like we put the phone in the kids’ pockets.”Agreeing with Webb is Peggy Anne Salz, founder of MSearchGroove.com, a leading blog on mobile search. Salz says the report is “a call to parents to participate in their children’s education, a process they can only improve and enhance with anytime, anywhere mobile access to educational materials.”“Read between the lines, and this is not about a connection between children having a mobile device and any drop in grade school literacy skills,” adds Salz. “The report argues there is a link between having literacy resources at home and a child’s reading ability. That’s an access issue that mobile devices can solve for children in the U.K. and around the world.”It is certainly true that mobile handset penetration is reaching a younger and younger audience, but that is not necessarily a direct catalyst to lowering reading scores. Whether the presence of books in a home affects a child’s ability to read is another argument, but it seems strange to try and hook that on mobile phone usage. As technology evolves, so too will the way kids “read” and consume information, so basing studies on the presence of older forms of information digestion may become less and less appropriate.UPDATE: I received a response after reaching out on Twitter to LeVar Burton, known famously for his love of reading and as the host of the children’s show Reading Rainbow. What did the book lover think of the fact that more children own phones than books? “I believe kids need both,” he said.Photo by Flickr user eyeliam. The Rise and Rise of Mobile Payment Technologylast_img read more

Bannock hunting and baby formula now part of Nutrition North

first_imgNutrition North has long been criticized for the way it works; paying retailers to lower their prices through a shipping subsidy instead of going directly to families.It replaced the Food Mail program in 2011, which retailers disliked.Now more food and non-food items will be eligible for the freight subsidy, Jones said. And there will be more ways to pay instead of only with credit cards.Jones said in exchange the government wants better reporting from retailers on how the subsidy is being applied.And consumers want to see that, too, she said, on receipts from more stores.But Nunavut premier Joe Savikataaq said giving retailers more subsidy money wouldn’t guarantee better prices.“We would like to see more direct benefit and subsidy to Nunavummiut,” he said in a release.And Nunavut should have “a dedicated presence” on the program’s advisory board, the premier added.Food reformThis is the Liberal government’s first major overhaul of Nutrition North after it held public hearings into the plan in 2016.Jones said her party will bump the program’s budget to $14 million and add a harvesters’ support grant program to help cushion the high cost of hunting.Food insecurity is a huge issue in northern and remote communities, where there is usually only one major supermarket.Retailers say shipping – mostly by air – jacks up the prices while consumers wonder why junk food is priced much lower than healthy goods.As a result, diets are poor and can lead to health problems.Something Nutrition North is supposed to address but often misses the mark, as APTN Investigates revealed in this documentary.“Nearly 70 per cent of Inuit households in Nunavut are food insecure,” said Aluki Kotierk, president of Inuit rights group Nunavut Tunngavik Inc.“Inuit children are living in food insecure households at a rate eight times the national average, among the highest documented food insecurity rate for an Indigenous population in a developed country.”Kotierk said adding money to offset the high cost of hunting country food would help many families.“It is a necessary and integral part of Inuit culture,” she said in a release.“It is our safety net, at a time of major social changes.”[email protected]@katmarte Ingredients to make bannock to be included in Nutrition North program. (APTN file)Kathleen MartensAPTN NewsThe Trudeau government is trying to make Nutrition North more palatable.It announced updates Monday to the remote and northern food subsidy program developed by the Harper government, including bannock-making ingredients.“Our government firmly believes that policy created with Northerners, for Northerners is the most effective,” said Labrador Lib-MP Yvonne Jones in Iqaluit.“The changes to the subsidy rates and the food eligibility list announced today reflect what we have heard from Northerners about how we can better help them access healthy foods.”Jones, parliamentary secretary to the minister of intergovernmental and northern affairs and internal trade, said more groceries, along with baby formula, would be added to the list of products subsidized under the program after complaints from consumers.Frozen fruits and vegetables, infant food and formula, spaghetti, macaroni and dried beans will be covered under the expanded formula starting January 2019.The complete list is here: Nutrition NorthWatch Kent Driscoll’s story on Nutrition Northlast_img read more

County unemployment rate rose slightly for second consecutive month

first_imgCounty unemployment rate rose slightly for second consecutive month Posted: August 16, 2019 KUSI Newsroom, Updated: 3:04 PM SAN DIEGO (KUSI) – San Diego County’s non-seasonally adjusted unemployment rate rose to 3.6% in July, the second consecutive month with an increase, according to data released today by the California EconomicDevelopment Department.The unemployment rate in the San Diego-Carlsbad region rose from a revised 3.3% in June to 3.6% last month. The rate steadily declined for most of the year’s first half but has now increased by nearly a full percentage pointfrom 2.7% in May to last month’s figure.The county’s total nonfarm employment dipped by 7,200 jobs, from 1,517,200 in June to 1,510,000 last month. Farm jobs held steady at 9,000 month- over-month.Several industries showed modest job gains in July, but those gains were wiped away by government entities shedding 14,500 jobs in the county, most of them education jobs during the summer months. The construction, leisure and hospitality, professional and business services and financial industries all added at least 1,000 jobs in July, according to the EDD.Despite the month-over-month job losses, the county’s unemployment rate is the same as last year’s July estimate of 3.6%. In that time, nonfarm industries have added nearly 30,000 jobs while farm jobs have fallen from 9,500 last July to 9,000 last month.Nonfarm jobs are up by 29,700 from 1,480,300 in July 2018 to 1,510,000 last month, with multiple industries showing gains of 3,000 jobs or more. Government jobs increased the most of any industry, adding 9,100 jobs, while professional and business services jobs increased by 8,400.The trade, transportation and utilities industry lost the most jobs year-over-year, shedding 3,000. The financial and information industries also lost 700 and 300 jobs, respectively.Statewide unemployment rose to a seasonally adjusted 4.1% in July, tying a record low.Nationwide, unemployment rose to an even 4% in July, up from 3.8% in June and down from 4.1% in June 2018. center_img KUSI Newsroom August 16, 2019 Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitterlast_img read more

61st GRAMMYs Poll Which Artist Had Your Favorite Red Carpet Look

last_img

SpiderMan Far From Homes new trailer spoils Avengers Endgame explodes the MCU

last_img