L’Esperance named Vermont State Police Director

first_imgDepartment of Public Safety Commissioner Thomas Tremblay is pleased to announce the selection of Major Thomas L Esperance as the next Director of the Vermont State Police. Major L Esperance will assume the duties of Director following Colonel James Baker s retirement on June 30, 2009.  Today s announcement will provide Major L Esperance and the Vermont State Police time to plan a seamless transition of leadership.In his announcement, Commissioner Tremblay said, I have full confidence in Major L Esperance; he is a proven leader, a trusted public servant, and he models the spirit of law enforcement cooperation that is essential for the future success of policing in Vermont.Major L Esperance began his career as a Trooper in Brattleboro in 1987 and currently serves as Major in charge of the Bureau of Criminal Investigations.  Over the past 21 years, Major L Esperance has also served in the following positions with the State Police:Detective Trooper, Brattleboro BarracksDetective Trooper, Southern Vermont Drug Task ForceSergeant, Patrol Commander, Rockingham BarracksField Supervisor, Southern Vermont Drug Task ForceLieutenant, Station Commander, Rockingham BarracksLieutenant, Drug Task Force CommanderCaptain, Special Investigations Unit Commander, Bureau of Criminal InvestigationsMajor L Esperance and his wife Denise have been married for twenty years.  They have two daughters – Rachel who attends Champlain Valley Union High School and Hannah who attends Williston Central School.Major L Esperance will continue in his current assignment as Major in charge of the Criminal Division until his promotion on July 1, 2009.last_img read more

AFL Completes ‘Operation Watch Over’ in Mali

first_imgA Platoon of the Armed Forces of Liberia (AFL) assigned with the United Nations peacekeeping force in Mali will for the first time participate in the medal parade in that West African state.To form part of the ceremony, the Minister of National Defense, Brownie J. Samukai, Jr., as head of an 18-man delegation departed the country on Wednesday for Mali to observe the AFL’s participation in the UN Medal Parade.Minister Samukai was authorized by the Commander-In-Chief (C-I-C) of the army and President of Liberia, Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, to participate in the first Medal Parade for the AFL troops serving under the MINUSMA mission in Diabali, Mali.Minister Samukai is being accompanied by the Chief of Staff (COS) of the AFL, Brigadier General Daniel Dee Ziankahn among others to witness the ceremony that is scheduled for Friday, June 6 in Mali. While in Mali, the Liberian delegation will assess the status, conditions and well-being of the troops and will hold discussions with Malian authorities on bilateral security cooperation, and with MINUSMA authorities on the rotation of AFL troops.Last year, C-I-C Sirleaf ordered enhanced Infantry Platoon of AFL personnel to Mali to form a part of the peacekeeping operations in June 2013.Prior to departing for Mali, Chief of Staff Ziankahn participated in the third and final leg of the AFL training, code named “Bonfire: Operation Watch Over III.” The exercise was implemented by the AFL in collaboration with authorities at the Ministry of National Defense in Monrovia. Defense authorities were represented at the occasion by the Deputy Minister for Operations, Saint Jerome Larbelee, while other representatives were officials from the offices of the Grand Bassa County Superintendent as well as mentors of the AFL.The well-attended exercise, which climaxed the Bonfire exercise ‘Watch Over’ was held on Wednesday, June 4, in Little Bassa, Grand Bassa County amidst drumming and singing of various Liberian songs led by the AFL Band Unit.Operation Watch Over, according to COS Ziankahn, is part of the AFL’s training involving field exercises where the soldiers are divided into factions fighting a ‘mock war.’ One fighting force used gorilla or jungle/rebel tactics, while the other, under government soldiers’ command, countered the rebel force using conventional warfare tactics.The Little Bassa ceremony was the third and final of a series of such trainings, which the AFL has used over the years to exercise the skills they acquired while in training, and at the same time, socialize with residents of local communities.“Operation Watch Over” is intended to also expose the troops to the different terrains across the country in case of any eventuality so that they will be prepared to defend and protect the territorial limits of Liberia.It is also intended to build the bridge of confidence between civilians and the new army, which operates on the motto, “A Force for Good”.“Because we are a civilian army…, we are obliged to maintain such status where the civilians will build confidence in the men and women of the AFL,” AFL’s 23rd Infantry Brigade Commander, Colonel Prince C. Johnson interjected.Several community members, including Moses Wee, Esther Garmai and Annie Koon, said they had hoped for the return of the soldiers to their community to entertain or reliev them of their various health situation free-of-charge.During the climax of the exercise, the AFL medical outreach team performed medical services for the community and shared gift items that included food and non-food items.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Christian Community Joins Ebola Fight

first_imgAt least 67 Christian denominational leaders have agreed to provide hand washing buckets at their churches in order to prevent the virus. They also pledged to work with the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare (MOHSW) and partners in reporting suspected Ebola cases within their communities and churches.These religious leaders are joining the fight in the wake of persistent reports from the Health Ministry that some Christian leaders, especially pastors and “praying mothers” are hiding suspected persons within their churches in the name of praying for those persons to recover from whatever sicknesses that they might be suffering from.Speaking on behalf of him and his colleagues after a one-day workshop held at the MoHSW, Catholic Archbishop Lewis Ziegler made a passionate plead to the public, including the Christian Community, to see the Ebola outbreak as a national emergency. He said Christians should not doubt the reality of the Ebola outbreak in Liberia but should instead work closely with the Health Ministry and partners in containing the spread of the virus which has claimed lives and continues to affect the health of Liberians.The Catholic Archbishop further urged the public to stop the state of denial and limit contacts with bodies of people infected, died or suspected of dying of Ebola. He also appealed to the public against performing the usual religious, traditional and other burial rites for those dying or suspected of dying of Ebola because these practices expose those taking part in them to the virus.Meanwhile, the MoHSW has reported that the deadly Ebola Virus has now spread its tentacle to Bomi, which is the fourth county to fall within grasp of the disease. In Bomi, which is on the highway to neighboring Sierra Leone, one of the hardest hit countries in the Mano River Union (MRU), has reported one confirmed death from the virus.Bomi now follows Lofa, Montserrado and Margibi counties, where the virus has taken at least 46 lives since the outbreak was reported March 22, 2014 to present.The disease spread through physical contact with victim. The virus also spreads sweat, saliva, blood by touching the vomit or urine of somebody who is sick with Ebola. Other means through which the disease spread include handshakes, kissing, and direct contact with body fluids of infected or dead persons or animals.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more