ON THIS WEEKEND

first_imgSaturday9 a.m.: Liverpool vs Newcastle10 p.m.: Aston Villa vs SouthamptonSunday8:05 a.m.: Sunderland vs Arsenal10:15 a.m.: Leicester vs Swansea SPORTSMAX 2last_img

Rams’ male cheerleaders make Super Bowl history

first_imgPDEA chief backs Robredo in revealing ‘discoveries’ on drug war Grace Poe files bill to protect govt teachers from malicious accusations Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. ‘We are too hospitable,’ says Sotto amid SEA Games woes Silence echoes across Pyeongchang Olympic venues As Tom Brady and the New England Patriots rewrote the record book with a 13-3 Super Bowl triumph over the Los Angeles Rams Sunday, Rams cheerleaders Quinton Peron and Napoleon Jinnies made some NFL history of their own.Rams cheerleader Napoleon Jinnies (C) performs with other cheerleaders during Super Bowl LIII.Image: TIMOTHY A. CLARY / AFPJinnies and Peron are part of a 40-member Rams cheerleader squad — the first male dance-style cheerleaders in the history of the league and now, the first to perform at a Super Bowl.ADVERTISEMENT MOST READ “I’m looking down at the Laker Girls and I thought, ‘Why can’t I do this?’” he said.Jinnies, a professional dancer and makeup artist, had a similar thought, when talking to fellow dancers.“We were just casually talking about auditions and I thought, ‘Why not just show up?’” NVGRELATED STORIES:How male cheerleaders are breaking gender norms at the SuperbowlADVERTISEMENT Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting LATEST STORIEScenter_img US judge bars Trump’s health insurance rule for immigrants SEA Games hosting troubles anger Duterte PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games PLAY LIST 02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss Oil plant explodes in Pampanga town ‘We are too hospitable,’ says Sotto amid SEA Games woes View comments Celebrity moments were plentiful at Super BowlSports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next While they’ve endured some hostility from some fans who believe NFL cheerleading should remain the preserve of women, Peron told the Los Angeles Times that the support of their families, a majority of fans and their fellow cheerleaders had carried them through.“Whatever has been out there we’ve been able to take it, because we know who has our backs,” Peron, 26, told the newspaper.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSUrgent reply from Philippine ‍football chiefSPORTSPalace wants Cayetano’s PHISGOC Foundation probed over corruption charges“Our family has our backs, our girls have our backs and the city of L.A., they’ve got us.”The Rams didn’t go into the season seeking to add men to the cheer squad. Peron, a professional dancer and choreographer got the idea to try out when he was watching a Los Angeles Lakers Basketball Game, where the Laker Girls cheerleaders entertain during pauses in the games.last_img read more

Montreals new flag to pay tribute to Indigenous people

Actor Lorne Cardinal wants Indigenous people to break through the white ceiling

first_imgLindsay RichardsonAPTN NewsAcclaimed Cree actor Lorne Cardinal says he wants to teach Indigenous youth to give up their fear.Speaking to a crowd gathered in Winnipeg for the Vision Quest conference and trade show, a two-day networking event bringing together Indigenous youth, artists, and entrepreneurs, Cardinal’s keynote speech focused on conquering insecurities, staying curious, and the importance of education.Wearing a black brocade jacket and a shell necklace, Cardinal reiterated the same crucial message in an interview with APTN News.“I mean shyness is good when you’re being polite about it, but when it starts debilitating you from talking to somebody – a potential employer or a potential business partner, then it becomes a problem,” Cardinal said.“Then you’re creating a problem for yourself.”As a film and television actor with more than three decades of experience, Cardinal has held prominent roles in shows like Corner Gas, North of 60, and APTN’s stop motion animated series Wapos Bay: The Series, among others.“It’s important to put the shyness aside and be able to stand tall and say ‘hi I’m so and so, from so and so,’ and that only comes with self-confidence,” he said.But Cardinal’s ascent into screen and stage acting hasn’t been without obstacles.As a child, he says he struggled with debilitating stage fright as the self-described “shy brown child” in his class.“It was terrifying the first time I public spoke in grade three – I passed out. And then when I tried it in grade 7 I threw up,” he said. “So I’ve had a little love-hate thing with speaking in public.”“[Now] I take a breath and go ‘here we go,’” Cardinal added.Even as the first Indigenous graduate with a bachelor of fine arts degree in acting from the University of Alberta, Cardinal encountered dissent and resistance when thrust into the “real world’ of acting.“There was still a lot of the attitude of I could only audition or read for Native parts,” he explained. “You know, I’d go approach an artistic director and say ‘I want to audition for you’ and [they’d say] ‘we’re not doing any native-themed plays this year.’”As Indigenous leaders and industry players work to “break through the white ceiling,” as Cardinal puts it, the power to create real changes comes with confidence, and persistence.“That attitude is changing – slowly, but it is changing. And the more that we have trained Indigenous people in schools, in theatre schools or in technical schools – it makes it easier,” he [email protected]@sentimtllast_img read more