Boston cathedral’s ‘Ministry of the Steps’ takes church’s welcome to…

first_img Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ By Bridget K. WoodPosted Jun 24, 2019 Curate Diocese of Nebraska Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Bath, NC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Martinsville, VA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET [Diocese of Massachusetts] A chess match between a police officer and a person who is homeless isn’t what you would necessarily expect to see while walking down Tremont Street in downtown Boston, Massachusetts. On the portico of the Cathedral Church of St. Paul, however, this has become the new normal during the summer months, thanks to the cathedral’s “Ministry of the Steps.”The Ministry of the Steps officially launched as a pilot program last summer, with just a tent canopy, some AstroTurf from Costco and an invitation to the community to join cathedral staff and volunteers in offering various outdoor activities to engage the community and those walking by.Dean Amy McCreath, right, plays bingo outside of the Cathedral Church of St. Paul in Boston, as part of its “Ministry of the Steps.” Photo: Bridget K. Wood/Diocese of MassachusettsThe activities range from chess, checkers and bingo games to art projects, drum circles, musical performances and chanting. Last year’s Ministry of the Steps included voter registration drives, as well as a witness against gun violence by the B-PEACE for Jorge Campaign. The Ministry of the Steps has now begun its second summer of programming with activities happening outside the cathedral on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays beginning at 9 a.m.Eva Ortez serves as a Life Together fellow for the MANNA ministry at the cathedral, a ministry of and with the homeless community in downtown Boston. Ortez experienced a powerful moment during a recent day of chess and checkers under the Ministry of the Steps canopy.“I took a step back and just wanted to take it all in, and in that moment, I noticed the amount of joy everyone there was experiencing,” Ortez said. “The group of people there was so diverse. There was a cop and an unhoused person playing, a young student and a recently housed person playing, and in the background there was a group of MANNA community members playing music, singing and dancing. Watching all of this and being part of something so beautiful almost brought tears to my eyes.”While the Ministry of the Steps is still new, it’s in keeping with the intent behind the decision to make St. Paul’s Church in downtown Boston the cathedral church of the Episcopal Diocese of Massachusetts in 1912, according to the cathedral’s dean, the Very Rev. Amy E. McCreath.“Bishop Lawrence chose St. Paul’s Church as the location for the cathedral of the diocese very much intentionally, wanting it to be in a place that was in the downtown area, where people from lots of different backgrounds were coming through,” McCreath explained in an interview. “Being on Boston Common is just perfect for that.”“Jesus encountered people in the marketplace, on the road and over meals, and a lot of Jesus’ style was to do something familiar but in a different way,” McCreath said. “People know about chess, they know about voter registration drives, they know about labyrinths, but they’re not expecting all of that to be kind of on the sidewalk and presented by somebody in a [clerical] collar, so it shakes things up a bit.”McCreath said that one of her favorite parts of the Ministry of the Steps is seeing people who are walking by stop and notice what is going on outside the cathedral, even if just for a brief moment.“There’s this kind of attention that may not translate into that person ever coming into the church, but they’re aware of it and they have a positive encounter,” McCreath said. “Part of what we are doing through the Ministry of the Steps is reclaiming all of that space in front of the cathedral for good, in a neighborhood where the steps are not always used for good.”During a presentation about the Ministry of the Steps at the diocesan Ministry Network Showcase last fall, the Rev. Jennifer McCracken, who serves as head pastor to the cathedral’s MANNA community, described it as a new ministry through recreation. “Or better still, re-creation,“ McCracken said. “Re-creating a sacred space outside for people to come and be welcomed to engage in community.”“Following Jesus into the neighborhood of chaos is always risky because it asks us to confront our fears and our doubts and our risk of failure,” McCracken said. “It also asks us to let go of our fenced-in spaces that confine us to smaller areas, and to move out into the world.”As part of the Ministry of the Steps, clergy will often stand outside on the sidewalk with a sign asking, “Do you want a blessing?”McCreath said this allows people to receive a blessing without having to climb the steps of the cathedral and go inside the church.“Those front steps are very intimidating — what we call a ‘high threshold to entry’ — so by coming down the steps, that just eliminates that barrier,” McCreath said.Kevin Neil serves on the MANNA pastoral team and helped to facilitate chess and checkers games as part of the Ministry of the Steps. Neil explained in an interview that this ministry allows the cathedral to interact with different groups of people than those who might walk up the steps and through the doors.“The concept of extending the welcome and the culture of hospitality, which we work really hard in the cathedral to cultivate on Sunday mornings and throughout the week in the building, are harder to extend beyond the building,” Neil said. “I think this is really helpful in making that possible and making it seem possible to folks actually outside on the sidewalk or across the street.”Libby Gatti serves as the chaplain to the MANNA community and said in an interview that one thing that makes this ministry unique is that people of all backgrounds are coming together on equal ground.“If you’re an unhoused person and you are coming to play chess or checkers … it’s not a transactional thing, it’s not like someone giving you money or handing you a plate of food,” Gatti said. “You’re two players playing a game together, so this is a little bit of a chance for deeper connection and for coming together on equal ground.”Andrew Fortes works downtown in the finance industry. An avid chess player, he noticed the chess games happening outside of the cathedral last summer and began to join in on his lunch breaks. Through these weekly chess games, Fortes built relationships with members of the MANNA community, and when the Ministry of the Steps came to an end with the fall weather, Fortes was invited to attend the Monday lunch program that MANNA hosts at the cathedral — a place where anyone can come and get a hot lunch on Mondays. Fortes began attending the lunches and subsequently began volunteering to help serve.In an interview, Fortes said that he keeps coming back to the Monday lunches not only because he feels like he is contributing to society and it brings him a sense of goodwill, but also because he gains wisdom from those he meets and has conversations with.“Just meeting people from different backgrounds really opens your eyes, and creates a level of openness in your mind,” Fortes said. “At the end of the day, everybody’s experience of life is different, and anybody that you can talk to can offer you some wisdom. Going to the Monday lunches, I always find myself gaining some type of wisdom.”Karen Sargent has been hired by the cathedral for the summer as the Ministry of the Steps intern, in charge of coordinating all of the programming for the ministry this summer. She is a seminarian at Boston University School of Theology.Sargent said that the goal of the Ministry of the Steps is to be a bridge between the cathedral church and the outside world and to let people know that they are welcome.“It’s just extending a welcome, which sometimes looks religious and sometimes it doesn’t,” Sargent said. “We are multidimensional humans, and the way faith is expressed is multifaceted, and so, bringing people’s passions into the space is just as much about religion as blessings are.”Sargent said that one of her goals with this ministry is to get more people involved from across the diocese, emphasizing that it is people’s individual passions and gifts that make a difference.“Come for an hour, come for two hours, bring your talent, bring your passions, bring your joy, and let’s see what we can do,” Sargent said. “Something can only be gained by stepping into something a little uncomfortable or a little new.”McCreath, the cathedral dean, encourages congregations of all sizes and locations to try something new in order to engage the world around them.“Not every church is in a location like this where they can just open their front doors and start doing a drum circle,” McCreath said. “But I think there’s something to be learned from it about just trying something out as a pilot project, that it doesn’t need to cost a lot of money, there’s always something to learn and that people are more ready to be engaged than we often think they are.”— Bridget K. Wood is communications assistant for the Diocese of Massachusetts. 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A Humanitarian Operations Brigade to Act During Public Emergencies

first_imgBy Marcos Ommati/Diálogo October 16, 2017 Very interesting! It is important to the brazilian army this event. We are really looking forward to what is coming afete SILOGEM. It is the first time that we will do an operation like Amazonlog. We will learn a lot with it. As a military, I think this event is absolutely important to develop our military force. We can know different ways to support operations in the Amazon, which is very hard for the logistics. I expect that it is going to be a sucess! Brazilian Army General Guilherme Cals Theophilo Gaspar de Oliveira, the logistics commander of the Brazilian Army (EB, per its Portuguese acronym), got straight to the point during his opening remarks at the Humanitarian Logistics Symposium (SILOGEM, per its Portuguese acronym): “We all know how precarious the infrastructure in the Amazon is, and of the lack of government presence in that region. Activities like this seek solutions for overcoming such challenges and preventing improvised assistance to the populations affected by disasters.” The general was referring to AMAZONLOG, an interagency humanitarian logistics exercise that will be held in South America for the first time from November 6th to 13th, in the Amazon region—specifically in the tri-border area between Brazil (Tabatinga), Colombia (Leticia), and Peru (Santa Rosa)—and for which SILOGEM served as a kick-off. In addition to these three countries’ militaries and the logistical support provided by the United States, the exercise, directed by the EB’s Logistics Command—currently led by Gen. Theophilo—will have observers from 17 partner nations with experience in humanitarian operations, including Germany, Canada, and the United Kingdom. U.S. participation “The United States, with its considerable experience in large-scale disasters and, consequently, in humanitarian aid, was the ‘father’ of the exercise in terms of knowledge,” Gen. Theophilo clarified. “The U.S. personnel are bringing their civil defense and damage-mitigation experience from the large hurricanes that happen regularly in the U.S., but not with troops — unlike Colombia and Peru, both of which share borders with Brazil in that area,” he added. “What we want is to create a tiny embryo so that it multiplies and is really the fruit of a large humanitarian operations brigade that will act during public emergencies. Therefore, our collaboration with all of the nations concerned is extremely important.” The idea, the general clarified, is for AMAZONLOG to be repeated every year, preferably in different countries for each edition of the exercise. SILOGEM SILOGEM, held from September 26th to 28th at the Vasco Vasques Convention Center in Manaus, the capital of Amazonas state, had close to 2,000 people participating. The event was divided into presentations by Brazilian and foreign military, government, and defense industry speakers, and round tables after every three or four presentations. The first SILOGEM seminar was offered by Brazilian Army General César Augusto Nardi de Souza. The chief of Joint Operations at the Brazilian Ministry of Defense spoke about subsequent actions in support of the civilian population, an issue of fundamental importance since the main purpose of AMAZONLOG is to train service members and civilian agencies to work together in a joint response to a potential disaster in an isolated area. “We are exploring our experience in joint humanitarian operations among our three branches, to conduct operations in the border environment,” he said during his presentation. In turn, Michael J. Eddy, the director of the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) in Brazil, commented on the importance of preventing the worst effects of disasters. “It is estimated that every dollar invested in disaster mitigation is worth five to 10 times more, in terms of the cost of aiding the victims. Hence the importance of governments, even with their bureaucratic hurdles, being prepared to deal with such situations.” Lieutenant General Jorge Céliz Kuong, the chief of the Peruvian Army’s 5th Division, began the second day of SILOGEM with a seminar series onthe support provided to civilians affected by drug trafficking and terrorism. Lt. Gen. Céliz told Diálogo that Peru will participate in AMAZONLOG with at least 50 service members, both officers and enlisted, who will, “carry out military patrols in the jungle. Specifically, during this exercise we will undertake humanitarian assistance operations. However, the most important element is to share experiences with the rest of the participating nations.” Instability situations Other issues addressed during SILOGEM included earthquakes in Haiti and in Chile, frequent floods and droughts in the Amazon (in northern Peru and in the Brazilian states of Acre and Amazonas), Haitian migration to South America (especially Brazil, Colombia, and Peru), demobilization of former members of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, and the more recent Venezuelan migration to Brazil. “These are all examples of instability situations that can have negative consequences if there is no planning or appropriate control measures,” Gen. Theophilo stated in an interview with Diálogo. A parallel Materiel Exhibition showcased stands from the U.S. and Brazilian militaries as well as from security and defense manufacturers. Dual-use materials, particularly those used in humanitarian support operations, were exhibited. “These companies showed products and solutions that will be used during AMAZONLOG 2017,” said Major General André de Soza Rolim, a budget planning advisor for the EB’s Logistics Command. “That’s why holding this exhibition at the same time is important. And it’s also hugely important that other interested companies get the Brazilian Ministry of Defense to register them as strategic companies, so they can expand and promote the Brazilian defense industry. AMAZONLOG will emphasize the issue of humanitarian defense, and companies with related products can offer them to the armed forces,” he concluded. Purified water A good example of one of the products showcased at the exhibit is a water purification system designed by the Tank Automotive Research, Development, and Engineering Center (TARDEC), which the United States will provide for use during the exercise. “We will provide compact water filters, which produce up to 120 gallons of water per hour when utilizing fresh water sources, which is the case with AMAZONLOG,” explained Doug Hedberg, the assistant director of TARDEC. “However, we can produce clean water from a variety of sources, including saline or extremely polluted waters. For other exercises, if this is the case, we can modify and upgrade the equipment.” Gen. Theophilo said that SILOGEM exceeded his expectations. “We now await AMAZONLOG itself. I expect this exercise to become a model for natural-disaster situations in which humanitarian aid will be needed by local or displaced populations, as well as by civilians and service members who may be working in the affected region,” he said. “For Brazil, it will be an opportunity to test the new military logistics of our land forces within the strategic objectives of EB, demonstrating the Brazilian government’s capacity for carrying out humanitarian operations in the regional sphere, gaining knowledge, integrating tactics and operations, exchanging information, learning about new technologies, strengthening its ties with academia, and bringing services to that border region, which is so important to Brazil, Colombia, and Peru.”last_img read more

Dodgers’ magic number remains 8 as Padres slow their roll

first_imgPreviousSan Diego Padres relief pitcher Kirby Yates, right, celebrates with Franmil Reyes after the Padres defeated the Dodgers 5-3 in a baseball game in Los Angeles, Friday, Sept. 21, 2018. (AP Photo/Alex Gallardo)LOS ANGELES, CA – SEPTEMBER 21: Enrique Hernandez #14 of the Los Angeles Dodgers robs Freddy Galvis #13 of the San Diego Padres of a hit with a diving catch to end the first inning of the game at Dodger Stadium on September 2, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Jayne Kamin-Oncea/Getty Images)Los Angeles Dodgers Ross Stripling throws to home plate against the San Diego Padres, Friday, Sept. 21, 2018, at Dodger Stadium. (Photo by Michael Owen Baker) SoundThe gallery will resume insecondsLos Angeles Dodgers Enrique Hernandez hits a solo home run in the third inning against the San Diego Padres, Friday, Sept. 21, 2018, at Dodger Stadium. (Photo by Michael Owen Baker)Los Angeles Dodgers Enrique Hernandez rounds the bases after hitting a solo home run in the third inning against the San Diego Padres, Friday, Sept. 21, 2018, at Dodger Stadium. (Photo by Michael Owen Baker)Los Angeles Dodgers Enrique Hernandez, left, is congratulated by Yasiel Puig after hitting a solo home run in the third inning against the San Diego Padres, Friday, Sept. 21, 2018, at Dodger Stadium. (Photo by Michael Owen Baker)Los Angeles Dodgers pitcher Ross Stripling grimaces after giving up a two-run home run in the fourth inning to the San Diego Padres’ Hunter Renfroe, left, Friday, Sept. 21, 2018, at Dodger Stadium. (Photo by Michael Owen Baker)San Diego Padres’ Hunter Renfroe, right, celebrates with Austin Hedges after hitting a two-run home run in the fourth inning against the Los Angeles Dodgers, Friday, Sept. 21, 2018, at Dodger Stadium. (Photo by Michael Owen Baker)Los Angeles Dodgers pitcher Ross Stripling hangs his head as he is pulled in the fourth inning against the San Diego Padres, Friday, Sept. 21, 2018, at Dodger Stadium. (Photo by Michael Owen Baker)San Diego Padres’ Hunter Renfroe, right, celebrates with Austin Hedges after hitting a two-run home run against the Los Angeles Dodgers during the fourth inning of a baseball game in Los Angeles, Friday, Sept. 21, 2018. (AP Photo/Alex Gallardo)LOS ANGELES, CA – SEPTEMBER 21: Eric Lauer #46 of the San Diego Padres pitches in the second inning of the game against the Los Angeles Dodgers at Dodger Stadium on September 21, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Jayne Kamin-Oncea/Getty Images)LOS ANGELES, CA – SEPTEMBER 21: Ross Stripling #68 of the Los Angeles Dodgers pitches in the first inning of the game against the San Diego Padres at Dodger Stadium on September 21, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Jayne Kamin-Oncea/Getty Images)LOS ANGELES, CA – SEPTEMBER 21: Francisco Mejia #27 of the San Diego Padres looks on as Enrique Hernandez #14 of the Los Angeles Dodgers crosses the plate after hitting a one run home run the third inning of the game at Dodger Stadium on September 2, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Jayne Kamin-Oncea/Getty Images)LOS ANGELES, CA – SEPTEMBER 21: Enrique Hernandez #14 is greeted by Justin Turner #10 of the Los Angeles Dodgers after hitting a one run home run the third inning of the game against the San Diego Padres at Dodger Stadium on September 2, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Jayne Kamin-Oncea/Getty Images)LOS ANGELES, CA – SEPTEMBER 21: Enrique Hernandez #14 is greeted by Yasiel Puig #66 of the Los Angeles Dodgers after hitting a one run home run the third inning of the game against the San Diego Padres at Dodger Stadium on September 2, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Jayne Kamin-Oncea/Getty Images)LOS ANGELES, CA – SEPTEMBER 21: Hunter Renfroe #10 of the San Diego Padres hits a two run home run in the fourth inning of the game against the Los Angeles Dodgers at Dodger Stadium on September 2, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Jayne Kamin-Oncea/Getty Images)LOS ANGELES, CA – SEPTEMBER 21: Hunter Renfroe #10 gets a chest bump from Franmil Reyes #32 of the San Diego Padres after crossing the plate after hitting a two run home run in the fourth inning of the game against the Los Angeles Dodgers at Dodger Stadium on September 2, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Jayne Kamin-Oncea/Getty Images)LOS ANGELES, CA – SEPTEMBER 21: Manager Dave Roberts #30 waits on the mound with Justin Turner #10 Yasmani Grandal #9 and David Freese #25 of the Los Angeles Dodgers during a pitching change in the fifth inning against the San Diego Padres at Dodger Stadium on September 2, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Jayne Kamin-Oncea/Getty Images)LOS ANGELES, CA – SEPTEMBER 21: Brian Dozier #6 of the Los Angeles Dodgers reacts as he flips his bat after flying out in the fifth inning against the San Diego Padres at Dodger Stadium on September 2, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Jayne Kamin-Oncea/Getty Images)LOS ANGELES, CA – SEPTEMBER 21: Fans look on as Matt Kemp #27 of the Los Angeles Dodgers reaches into foul territory to catch a ball hit by Wil Myers #4 of the San Diego Padres for an out in the fifth inning at Dodger Stadium on September 2, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Jayne Kamin-Oncea/Getty Images)San Diego Padres starting pitcher Eric Lauer reaches to attempt to backhand a line drive hit for a double by Los Angeles Dodgers’ Justin Turner during the first inning of a baseball game in Los Angeles, Friday, Sept. 21, 2018. (AP Photo/Alex Gallardo)Los Angeles Dodgers starting pitcher Ross Stripling delivers to a San Diego Padres batter during the first inning of a baseball game in Los Angeles, Friday, Sept. 21, 2018. (AP Photo/Alex Gallardo)San Diego Padres starting pitcher Eric Lauer works to a Los Angeles Dodgers batter during the first inning of a baseball game in Los Angeles, Friday, Sept. 21, 2018. (AP Photo/Alex Gallardo)San Diego Padres third baseman Wil Myers throws out Los Angeles Dodgers’ Manny Machado after fielding a ground ball during the first inning of a baseball game in Los Angeles, Friday, Sept. 21, 2018. (AP Photo/Alex Gallardo)Los Angeles Dodgers shortstop Manny Machado, left, catches San Diego Padres Wil Myers in a rundown between first and second on a steal-attempt during the third inning of a baseball game in Los Angeles, Friday, Sept. 21, 2018. (AP Photo/Alex Gallardo)Los Angeles Dodgers starting pitcher Ross Stripling, left, talks to himself while San Diego Padres’ Franmil Reyes rounds third base after Hunter Renfroe hit a two-run home run during the fourth inning of a baseball game in Los Angeles, Friday, Sept. 21, 2018. (AP Photo/Alex Gallardo)Los Angeles Dodgers manager Dave Roberts, left, removes starting pitcher Ross Stripling, with catcher Yasmani Grandal, second from left, watching during the fourth inning of the team’s baseball game against the San Diego Padres in Los Angeles, Friday, Sept. 21, 2018. (AP Photo/Alex Gallardo)Los Angeles Dodgers’ Enrique Hernandez, front, steps on home plate next to San Diego Padres catcher Francisco Mejia after hitting a solo home run during the third inning of a baseball game in Los Angeles, Friday, Sept. 21, 2018. (AP Photo/Alex Gallardo)Los Angeles Dodgers’ Enrique Hernandez, left, celebrates with Justin Turner after hitting a solo home run against the San Diego Padres during the third inning of a baseball game in Los Angeles, Friday, Sept. 21, 2018. (AP Photo/Alex Gallardo)San Diego Padres’ Wil Myers watches his two-run double, which scored Freddy Galvis and Manuel Margot during the ninth inning of Friday’s game against the Dodgers at Dodger Stadium. (AP Photo/Alex Gallardo)San Diego Padres’ Freddy Galvis, makes a gesture upon touching home plate after hitting a solo home run, next to Los Angeles Dodgers catcher Yasmani Grandal during the seventh inning of a baseball game in Los Angeles, Friday, Sept. 21, 2018. (AP Photo/Alex Gallardo)San Diego Padres relief pitcher Kirby Yates can’t field a ground ball hit for a single by Los Angeles Dodgers’ Alex Verdugo during the ninth inning of a baseball game in Los Angeles, Friday, Sept. 21, 2018. (AP Photo/Alex Gallardo)San Diego Padres relief pitcher Kirby Yates, right, is congratulated by catcher Austin Hedges after the Padres defeated the Los Angeles Dodgers 5-3 in a baseball game in Los Angeles, Friday, Sept. 21, 2018. (AP Photo/Alex Gallardo)San Diego Padres relief pitcher Kirby Yates, right, celebrates with Franmil Reyes after the Padres defeated the Dodgers 5-3 in a baseball game in Los Angeles, Friday, Sept. 21, 2018. (AP Photo/Alex Gallardo)LOS ANGELES, CA – SEPTEMBER 21: Enrique Hernandez #14 of the Los Angeles Dodgers robs Freddy Galvis #13 of the San Diego Padres of a hit with a diving catch to end the first inning of the game at Dodger Stadium on September 2, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Jayne Kamin-Oncea/Getty Images)NextShow Caption1 of 33LOS ANGELES, CA – SEPTEMBER 21: Enrique Hernandez #14 of the Los Angeles Dodgers robs Freddy Galvis #13 of the San Diego Padres of a hit with a diving catch to end the first inning of the game at Dodger Stadium on September 2, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Jayne Kamin-Oncea/Getty Images)ExpandLOS ANGELES — Maybe it’s just a pause to take a deep breath – you know, like right before you jump in a pool.The Dodgers’ march to clinch their sixth consecutive division title developed a familiar hitch in it Friday night as the San Diego Padres handed them a 5-3 defeat.Over the past three weeks, the Dodgers have gone 11-3 against fellow playoff contenders in the Rockies, Cardinals and Diamondbacks – but 2-5 in what Dodgers manager Dave Roberts called “trap series” against the Mets, Reds and Padres.“That’s a tough one to figure out,” Roberts said Friday. “Coming off this last series (a three-game sweep of the Rockies), I thought we were playing well, having good at-bats. Coming into tonight’s game, I thought we were ready to go. It just didn’t work out where we scored more runs than they did. But I don’t think it was a letdown situation.” The loss was definitely a slowdown situation. It was only the Dodgers’ second in their past nine games but it allowed the Colorado Rockies to move back within 1½ games of the National League West lead by beating the Arizona Diamondbacks (the Dodgers’ next opponent) and stalled the Dodgers’ magic number to clinch at eight.Sign up for our Inside the Dodgers newsletter. Be the best Dodger fan you can be by getting daily intel on your favorite team. Subscribe here.At the same time, the Atlanta Braves won, moving closer to clinching the NL East – and moving a game ahead of the Dodgers for home-field advantage in a potential best-of-5 NL Division Series matchup.“It’s baseball,” Dodgers third baseman Justin Turner said. “They’re over there trying to win games too.”Only one team in the National League (the Miami Marlins) has managed to do that less often than the 62-92 Padres this season.“Can’t take anyone for granted. Those are big leaguers over there. They’re here for a reason,” Dodgers starting pitcher Ross Stripling said. “Obviously coming off a huge sweep of the Rockies, we used a lot of energy, that kind of stuff. But I feel like we showed up ready to play. They just beat us today. “Just can’t get too high or too low. Just go out and play Dodger baseball every day, no matter who the opponent is.”The playoff-level energy that characterized Dodger Stadium during the heroics-heavy sweep of the Rockies was tamped down Friday night as the Dodgers managed only four hits through the first seven innings.Their only run off Padres starter Eric Lauer came in the third inning when Kike’ Hernandez hit a liner into the left-field pavilion. It was the Dodgers’ 219th home run of the season (two short of matching the franchise record set last season).There wasn’t much else to work with against Lauer who is 6-7 in his rookie season – but 3-0 with a 0.92 ERA in three starts against the Dodgers.“He’s brought his best against us,” Roberts said. “Fastball, cutter in and stealing strikes with the curveball. A couple guys had some good swings off him but collectively we just can’t figure him out.”The Dodgers put two runners on with two outs in the fifth against Lauer but Manny Machado struck out. They did it again in the seventh against the Padres bullpen and a wild pitch even moved them up. But Turner flew out to left.Finally, in the eighth inning, Joc Pederson doubled with one out and scored on a two-out single by Yasiel Puig.That inning ended with the Dodgers again stranding two runners when Cody Bellinger struck out. After going 25 for 78 (.321) with runners in scoring position over their previous 10 games, the Dodgers were 2 for 9 against the Padres and stranded 10 runners.The Padres didn’t manage many base runners at all through the first seven innings. But two of their four hits in that time were home runs by Hunter Renfroe and Freddy Galvis. A two-run double by Wil Myers in the ninth put the game away for the Padres.Related Articles How Dodgers pitcher Ross Stripling topped the baseball podcast empire Cody Bellinger homer gives Dodgers their first walkoff win of season Dodgers hit seven home runs, sweep Colorado Rockies center_img If Stripling’s move back into the rotation (bumping Alex Wood to the bullpen) is an audition for a role in a potential playoff series, it has not gone well. An All-Star based on the way he rescued the Dodgers’ rotation in the first half, Stripling has yet to recapture that form.The right-hander has made three starts now since returning from a lower back injury and rejoining the Dodgers’ rotation. He has been done after 3-1/3 innings each time. Friday night, he allowed five of the last six batters he faced to reach base – a single by Wil Myers in the third (he was picked off first) and another by Franmil Reyes to start the fourth, Renfroe’s homer two batters later and back-to-back 10-pitch at-bats that ended in walks.Over 10 innings in these three starts, Stripling has allowed six runs on 10 hits, walked three and struck out 13.“The stuff is good when he comes out,” Roberts said. “I think he’s built up. It’s just making a couple pitches that he needs to make to wipe guys out. But to come in and expect after three starts or two starts that he’s going to be locked in, that’s probably a little unfair.” Fire danger is on Dave Roberts’ mind as Dodgers head to San Francisco Dodgers’ Max Muncy trying to work his way out of slow start Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more