Rob Howley signs with Wales until 2016

first_img“Our future, based upon long term planning around the right people, is very exciting indeed.” “When I asked him to join the coaching team in Wales I knew the level of professionalism and skill he would bring with him and that has proved to be the case.“He is already an accomplished coach, but I know the experience and opportunities he will have in the years ahead will improve him even more.“There is a lot of hard work ahead, but the coaches around me have grown in stature over our time together and the continuity we now look forward to will help us achieve our aims.“At this level we are often criticised if our performance doesn’t meet outside expectations, but the biggest endorsement I can give of Rob is that, after the Lions experience in 2009, a high number of players commented to me that he was the best backs coach they had worked with, which speaks volumes.”Howley signed his new contract for Wales following close discussion with Warren Gatland and detailed negotiations with the Group Chief Executive of the Welsh Rugby Union, Roger Lewis.Lewis said: “I am delighted Rob has decided to commit his coaching future to Wales through to the summer of 2016 at least.“I viewed it as vitally important for us to retain a coach of his stature in an agreement which ensured Wales achieved coaching continuity after the Rugby World Cup in 2015.“Moreover Rob has also agreed to work with Joe Lydon our Head of Rugby to assist in the development of our National Academy age grade teams.“We know we now have in place, under Warren Gatland, a coaching line up which is the envy of the rugby world and there will be intense pressure from other nations for their services when the opportunity arises.“That is right and proper, but the systems and structures the WRU have put in place must be retained and developed for the benefit of Welsh rugby as whole.“Rob is a good manand a determined and talented coach who I know will take every opportunity to develop and expand his skills in the years ahead.“We have created an environment here in Wales which helps players and coaches achieve their full potential. We will ensure those systems and structures remain robust and continue to develop. “This has been achieved by the sound financial management of the WRU.“With Warren and his coaching team of Rob, Shaun Edwards, Neil Jenkins and Robin McBryde now in place we can look forward to some exciting and engaging rugby ahead from the national team.“I must also pay fulsome tribute to the unsung heroes of the coaching team Prav Mathema, Adam Beard and Rhys Long. Their contribution this year to Welsh rugby has been immense. Most importantly they also will advise on the development of our National Academy. DUNEDIN, NEW ZEALAND – JUNE 19: Welsh fans before the First Test match between the New Zealand All Blacks and Wales at Carisbrook on June 19, 2010 in Dunedin, New Zealand. (Photo by Phil Walter/Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Wales Assistant Coach Rob Howley has agreed a new contract with the Welsh Rugby Union which will ensure he continues at the helm of the senior team for at least a full season after the next Rugby World Cup in 2015.The agreement means that Howley is assured to represent a continuation of the current coaching regime policies until the middle of 2016.It is a move which removes the potential for a scenario in which all currently contracted coaching staff could theoretically decide to move from Wales at the same time following the next Rugby World Cup.It is currently commonplace throughout rugby for senior coaches to be contracted up to and including Rugby World Cup competitions.Howley is a key member of Warren Gatland’s coaching team and has been his Assistant Coach in charge of attack since 2008.He played for Bridgend and Cardiff winning 59 caps for Wales, 22 as captain before joining London Wasps where he completed his playing career.Howley also earned selection for two British & Irish Lions tours to South Africa in 1997 and Australia in 2001 where he won two Test caps.He started his coaching career at Wasps under Warren Gatland before moving to Cardiff Blues from where he was recruited to the Wales coaching line up.He said: “I have thoroughly enjoyed the time I have spent with the national team so far so I am delighted that work can now continueat least until 2016.“As a coaching team we have achieved a lot of our aims in recent years but there are still a lot of exciting and challenging opportunities ahead.“We have the right structures and systems in place, a team brimful of young talent alongside some valuable experience and a mouth watering fixture schedule.“I am personally ambitious to become the best coach I possibly can be and it is fantastic for me to be able to continue to advance my skills here in Wales with the Welsh team.“As a coach I understand the importance of continuity and I know the strengths and weaknesses of our players and the youngsters who will be challenging for selection in the near future.“I want to spend the next few years focused on Welsh success and I am determined to develop my own repertoire of skills so I can make a valid and worthwhile to rugby in Wales.“I am a proud Welshman and anyone who works with me knows I want nothing more that success for Wales.“The Rugby World Cup proved to us as a coaching team that we are heading in the right direction and that just inspires me for the future.”Wales Head Coach Warren Gatland, said: “I am delighted that Rob will be working with us through until the next Rugby World Cup and will be continuing that work on into 2016.last_img read more

Rugby World Magazine goes digital!

first_imgThere is even better news for subscribers, who can download the magazine at no extra cost.The digital edition is not exclusive to Apple’s Newsstand, you can also download it on the Nook, Kindle and Google’s Play Store. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS YOU CAN now get Rugby World digitally after the world’s best-selling rugby magazine was launched on Apple’s Newsstand. This allows users to download the latest publication on the iPad and iPad Mini.To download the app, click here…You can also browse your favourite rugby news, opinion, fitness and in-depth players interviews within minutes anywhere in the world, and if you’ve missed a copy, you can download back issues.last_img read more

Ireland: Five things we learned against Australia

first_img Getting pushed about: Every Irish error was punished by a resurgent Wallabies side at the Aviva Stadium on SaturdayBy Claire GlancyIRELAND’S PERFORMANCE against Australia was riddled with errors and they were punished for each and every one of them. But as Joe Schmidt himself said, “We’re a work in progress” so without compounding them with too much negativity, nor wanting to patronize, here are five things we’ve learned.He who dares, winsIt doesn’t matter how much ball a team has, if they don’t use it wisely, then they’re already losing.  Given the number of times Ireland kicked it into the hands of one of the world’s best full backs, Israel Folau, it’s actually surprising to discover the amount of possession and territory they had. From Australia’s point of view, they scored four tries, conceded none, played nearly twenty minutes with fourteen men and still won the match with only 35% of the ball.  It’s no wonder Ewen McKenzie called it their ‘most complete performance’ to date. It’s as simple as this: Australia took their chances. And for a lot of that time, the Irish defence had ringside seats for the crossovers.Surprisingly poor: Ireland’s set-piece didn’t show up wellThe set piece is far from settledThe scrum was viewed as an area of weakness in the Wallabies and one Ireland could target. Losing three of seven from their own put in is not something Ireland will have considered and given Australia’s scrum was viewed as the weakest in the Rugby Championship, it makes next week’s task against New Zealand even greater.Overall the lineout faired better, but losing their first of the game will have shaken the Irish pack who, under Paul O’Connell’s guidance, have always prided themselves in this area.Without Sexton, Ireland were ‘rudderless’ LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Australia’s Nic White looks for the ball in the scrum during the international rugby union test match between Ireland and Australia at Aviva Stadium in Dublin on November 16, 2013. AFP PHOTO / PETER MUHLY (Photo credit should read PETER MUHLY/AFP/Getty Images) Jonathan Sexton’s departure with a hamstring injury on the stroke of half time was a game-changer.That’s not to say Ireland would have won, or deserved to win had he been on the pitch for the full 80, but Sexton was instrumental in bringing Ireland back from twelve points down to three at the break. It was a tough ask for Madigan to come on at that stage in such a tight game but, with the exception of Luke Marshall, he was surrounded by regular test internationals in the Irish back division. Their experience and know-how should have soaked up some of the pressure on the youngsters. It’s good to be disciplined, but not dispassionateThe recently retired Ronan O’Gara and Shane Horgan commented afterwards on the Irish players’ reaction to Kevita Kuridrani’s tip tackle on Peter O’Mahony.  Neither could believe his team-mates weren’t riled by this attack on one of their own and didn’t wade in to protest against the Wallaby’s actions. Does this show a lack of passion or unity?  Understandably, players hate to have their commitment questioned, but clearly it’s early days for a side who haven’t bonded enough yet that they’d do anything for each other on the pitch.Early days: Schmidt needs time to sort a scrambling sideIn Joe we trustThere wasn’t much for the home crowd to smile about at the Aviva Stadium but remarkably, with Ireland trailing by nine points in the first half, as the cameras panned to Joe Schmidt on the big screen, a big cheer went out. When the New Zealander took over at Leinster they had just won the Heineken Cup under Michael Cheika and started the season with three defeats from their first four games. But after that, Schmidt’s men lost only four games in all competitions as they made their way to the Magner’s League final and retaining the Heineken Cup.So even though the Kiwi is under pressure to deliver, Irish fans will and should be patient, giving him time to make the step from club to international coach. It’s a big transition for a player and coaches are no different. By the end of the Six Nations, and certainly by this time next year, we should have a clearer picture of what direction the national side will take under the new management.last_img read more

Five of rugby’s biggest borefests

first_imgAfter fans and viewers slept through a turgid 80 minutes in Melbourne between Australia and France – which a produced a pitiful six points – we delve into to history books to bring you five more shockers Sometimes the scoreboard doesn’t tell the whole story and sometimes it does, and it was sure telling the truth on this occasion. There was a nasty wind throughout, what used to be called the “Twickenham Twirl”, but the pointless encounter emphasised the generally sterile style of British rugby in the early 1960s. Wales were the dominant side but full-back Kel Coslett missed five attempts at goal on his debut while fly-half Alan Rees (also winning his fist cap) was wide with four drop goals. Having moved the Twickenham crowd to tears, the pair did the decent thing and moved to rugby league later that year. So much for Aussie innovation and French flair. Last weekend’s second Test in Melbourne was one of the biggest borefests in modern memory. A scoreless first half followed by a similarly dire second period, although at least the Wallabies did manage to land a couple of penalties. By the final whistle most of the 27,000 crowd were either asleep or in tears, trying to remember the last time Test rugby had been treated to such a tedious spectacle. Let us help. Here are five more matches that are best forgotten.We are not amused: Warren Gatland watches on as Wales and Scotland rack up a record 28 of penaltiesScotland 18 Wales 28, 2013Referee Craig Joubert was largely to blame for this bore of a match that broke the record for the number of kickable penalties awarded in an international. The South African whistle-blower gave 28 penalties – 16 against Scotland and 12 against the visitors – and 18 of them were within kicking distance of the posts. Greg Laidlaw landed six of his eight attempts while Leigh Halfpenny potted seven from ten and also converted Richard Hibbard’s try. The set-piece was similarly stultifying with only three completed scrums in 80 minutes. “We tried to do what the referee wanted but every time we did something else would happen,” complained Scotland hooker Ross Ford.Australia 142 Namibia 0, 2003This World Cup group match was so one-sided the Adelaide crowd lost interest long before the final whistle. Chris Latham scored the Wallabies’ first try after just two minutes and there were 21 more in the remaining 78 minutes. Latham (who finished with five tries) Lote Tuqiri and Matt Giteau all scored hat-tricks against an understrength Namibian side whose leading players were being rested for the game against Romania five days later. The result was the biggest winning margin in World Cup history but the torrent of tries did the sport no favours.Dejected: The Namibian players were on the end of a142-0 drubbing that was little fun to watchScotland 6 England 9, 1988 Please make it end: The Wallaby management look bored watching the 6-0 win over France center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS It wasn’t just the players’ pride that got dented as a result of this colourless Calcutta Cup encounter. Late on Saturday night England’s Dean Richards and Scotland’s John Jeffrey took the famous old trophy on a tour of Edinburgh pubs, returning a few hours later with something that looked more like a shield than a cup. As for the game itself, it was in the words of one Scottish newspaper “a snoozathon” with all the points coming from penalties. “England killed the ball at every opportunity,” muttered Scotland captain Gary Callender. “ They didn’t seem to mind just moving from one scrum to the next.”Forward battle: The 1988 Calcutta Cup was a game with few positivesScotland 0, Wales 6, 1963The brutal winter of 1963 was known as the ‘Big Freeze’ but that was still no excuse for the numbing display of rugby served up between Scotland and Wales in that year’s Five Nations. Wales’ Clive Rowlands was the ringmaster of boredom, the scrum-half kicking for touch continuously in a game that contained 111 line-outs. Admittedly, Rowlands did land a sweet drop goal but that was the only highlight of a game which the Daily Telegraph labelled “the ultimate in non-handling rugby”.England 0 Wales 0, 1962last_img read more

Premiership final Exeter v Wasps live stream: Match preview and how to watch

first_imgMore than a year since it commenced, the 2019-20 Premiership reaches a tantalising climax as Exeter and Wasps clash at Twickenham today. Here’s what you need to know Double sting: Exeter’s Ian Whitten is pincered during their win over Wasps in the 2017 final (Getty Images) Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. * Jack Willis’s turnover tally of 44 in this season’s Premiership is the most recorded since Opta began collecting this data in 2008/09.* Wasps wing Zach Kibirige has made more clean breaks (30) than any other player in the league this season. He is one of five players with ten tries in this campaign, Chiefs forwards Jonny Hill and Sam Simmonds being others. Ollie Thorley and Ben Earl have 11 each.* Gareth Steenson has scored 1,651 points in his Premiership career. Six more points would see him leapfrog Nick Evans as the fourth-highest scorer in the competition’s history.Although sadly there will be no fans at Twickenham today, you can still buy the official match programme – click here to get your memento.Below you can watch highlights of the incredible 2017 final, won 23-20 by Exeter.Exeter: Stuart Hogg; Jack Nowell, Henry Slade, Ollie Devoto, Olly Woodburn; Joe Simmonds (capt), Jack Maunder; Alec Hepburn, Luke Cowan-Dickie, Harry Williams, Sam Skinner, Jonny Hill, Dave Ewers, Jannes Kirsten, Sam Simmonds.Replacements: 16 Jack Yeandle, 17 Ben Moon, 18 Tomas Francis, 19 Jonny Gray, 20 Jacques Vermeulen, 21 Sam Hidalgo-Clyne, 22 Gareth Steenson, 23 Ian Whitten.Wasps: Matteo Minozzi; Zach Kibirige, Juan de Jongh, Jimmy Gopperth, Josh Bassett; Jacob Umaga, Dan Robson; Tom West, Tommy Taylor, Jeff Toomaga-Allen, Joe Launchbury (capt), Will Rowlands, Jack Willis, Thomas Young, Tom Willis.Replacements: 16 Gabriel Oghre, 17 Ben Harris, 18 Biyi Alo, 19 James Gaskell, 20 Ben Morris, 21 Ben Vellacott, 22 Lima Sopoaga, 23 Michael Le Bourgeois.Here’s how to find a reliable live stream for today’s Premiership final wherever you are…How to watch Exeter v Wasps from outside your countryIf you’re abroad but still want to watch your local Premiership coverage, like Exeter v Wasps, you can do so by using a VPN – Virtual Private Network.VPNs allow you to get around any geo-blocking by changing your IP address, so you appear in a different location and can watch the same legal Premiership live stream you would at home.Our friends at TechRadar have tested hundreds of VPN and recommend ExpressVPN, which is easy to use, has strong security features and allows you to watch on several devices at once, including smart TVs and phones, iPads, tablets, PCs and Macs.Plus, ExpressVPN comes with a 30-day money-back guarantee. You can try it out for a month for free or sign up for an annual plan and get three months free.Check out ExpressVPNExeter v Wasps live stream: How to watch from the UKExeter v Wasps, which kicks off at 6pm today, will be shown live on BT Sport 1 in the UK. Coverage starts at 5.15pm. If you don’t have a BT contract but want to watch the match, don’t worry because you can still easily watch it online.That’s because BT Sport has a contract-free monthly pass that allows you to get instant access to all four of their sport channels for just £25.Get a BT Sport Monthly PassIf you’re from the UK but are overseas when the Premiership final takes place, you can get your normal live stream but you’ll need a VPN – see the information above.Channel 5 will be showing highlights of the final tomorrow – the show starts at 1.05pm.Exeter v Wasps live stream: How to watch from EuropeIf you’re in Austria, Germany, Liechtenstein or Switzerland, you can watch the Premiership final (kick-off 7pm) through the live and on-demand streaming service DAZN.Exeter v Wasps live stream: How to watch from the USAIf you live in the States, the official broadcaster of Premiership matches is NBC, with matches streamed on NBC Sports Gold so you can watch them anytime and anywhere.Exeter v Wasps will kick off at 1pm EST and 10am on the West Coast.The NBC Sports Gold Pass for rugby is $79.99 and includes coverage of the Gallagher Premiership, European Champions and Challenge Cups, and Guinness Six Nations.Exeter v Wasps live stream: How to watch from AustraliaFor those in Australia, Fox Sports have the rights to show Premiership matches and you can watch Exeter v Wasps at 4am on Sunday (AEST).The Foxtel Sports HD bundle is $74 a month – and you get 50+ other channels as well as Foxtel GO so you can watch when on the move.Foxtel Sports HD bundleExeter v Wasps live stream: How to watch from New ZealandIt’s little wonder that Sky Sport NZ, with ten sports channels, including one dedicated to rugby, is the rights-holder for Premiership matches in New Zealand.If you want to tune in to the Premiership final from the Land of the Long White Cloud, the match kicks off at 6am on Sunday on Sky Sport NZ 1.It costs $31.99 a month to add Sky Sport to your Sky Starter pack ($25.99), but if you sign up for 12 months before 31 January you’ll get your first month free. Plus, you’ll get Sky Go, which allows you to watch live rugby wherever you are.Sky Sport NZ offerExeter v Wasps live stream: How to watch from South AfricaIf you want to keep track of the many South Africans plying their trade in the Premiership, SuperSport shows matches in South Africa. South Africa is one hour ahead of the UK, so Exeter v Wasps kicks off at 7pm on SuperSport Variety 1.There are various DStv packages that give access to SuperSport, ranging from Access, which has the Blitz and Variety 4 channels, to Premium, which includes all 18 sports channels.Exeter v Wasps live stream: How to watch from JapanDAZN, which allows you to live stream sport or watch it on demand, is the place to go to watch the Premiership final in Japan (kick-off 2am). The service is compatible with smart TVs and phones, tablets, PCs, streaming sticks, set-top boxes, gaming consoles and more.Find out more about DAZN hereWe recommend VPN services in the context of legal recreational uses. For example:Accessing a service from another country (subject to the terms and conditions of that service)Protecting your online security and strengthening your online privacy when abroadWe do not support or condone the illegal or malicious use of VPN services. Consuming pirated content that is paid-for is neither endorsed nor approved by Future Publishing. center_img Premiership final Exeter v Wasps live stream: Match preview and how to watchPhew, almost there. After an avalanche of games post lockdown passed without incident, recent weeks have seen Covid-19 cause a degree of chaos to the enthralling 2019-20 Gallagher Premiership season run-in.Today’s final between Exeter and Wasps at Twickenham (6pm) was in jeopardy until midweek. Even though Wasps got the green light to play, 11 of their 33-man squad are unavailable having tested positive for coronavirus or been in close contact with someone who has. Four of the absent 11 would have been in today’s match-day squad.A knock-on effect is that Wasps have barely trained in the past fortnight, although head coach Lee Blackett said: “You could argue we’ll be fresh.”Referee Wayne Barnes has also tested positive for Covid-19 and so will miss out on his tenth final. Craig Maxwell-Keys takes charge of it for the first time while Danae Zamboulis becomes the first woman to serve as citing officer in a Premiership final.In 2017, the two teams produced a classic Premiership final in which Wasps came within 30 seconds of victory. Then Nathan Hughes conceded a breakdown penalty that Gareth Steenson kicked to square the match. A collapsed scrum allowed Steenson to win it in extra time.Rapture: Jack Nowell celebrates scoring in the 2017 final, a red-letter day for the Chiefs (Getty Images)Twickenham throbbed with tension and excitement that glorious May day. This evening’s match in the cavernous stadium will lack the atmosphere but it could prove another belter, even if the weather doesn’t play ball.Exeter are heavily favoured by the bookies. They topped the table with ease – the gap over Wasps narrowing late on only because Chiefs rested players – and are buoyed by bagging their first Heineken Champions Cup crown a week ago. They are bidding to emulate Leicester, Wasps and Saracens in achieving a domestic and European double.Wasps will not be cowed, having won three of the past five Premiership meetings. And they have been tearing up trees this year, winning 12 of their past 13 league matches with an average of five tries and 40 points a game.Explaining how they’ve shot from tenth place last Christmas to title contenders, centre Jimmy Gopperth told BT Sport recently: “The main thing is we stayed positive to our process and what we’re trying to achieve.“The number one thing that Lee has installed with us is enjoyment. You bash your body every day, so when you come out to play a game you’ve got to have a smile on your face. You’ve got to enjoy it, otherwise there’s no point.”The sides met as recently as three weeks ago, when Wasps thrashed an understrength Chiefs 46-5. Exeter had won 38-3 earlier in the season, although Wasps are a different animal now.Coming through: Jimmy Gopperth scores Wasps’ third try against the Chiefs earlier this month (Getty)Even so, four of Chiefs’ five tries derived from the forwards – two pick and goes, a lineout drive and a penalty try from an advancing scrum. That is what Exeter do to opponents on a regular basis and it’s a measure of the task facing Wasps today.Wasps are chasing their fifth Premiership final victory, which would see them tie with Saracens for most titles in the play-off era. If they’re to succeed, they’ll need to spoil Exeter’s possession at the breakdown, as Racing managed to do at times in the Champions Cup final.Related content: Exeter become European championsBack-row Jack Willis has been monumental this season and will need to be again. “Why is he the Premiership Player of the Season? Because time and time again he makes huge impacts when it counts,” said Austin Healey during Wasps’ semi-final win over Bristol. “Those guys (selectors) watching… if you pick anyone else, we need someone else in charge of England.”Willis is exceptional in several areas but his 44 turnovers won in this season’s Premiership – more than the next two players on the list combined – is astonishing. Exeter will surely plan to resource the rucks a little more diligently than a week ago.England class: Wasps back-row Jack Willis after winning a turnover against Bristol in the semi-final (Getty)The Chiefs freshen up their starting XV, with Ollie Devoto replacing Ian Whitten at centre and Olly Woodburn getting the nod over Tom O’Flaherty on the wing. Up front, Sam Skinner and Jannes Kirsten start in place of Jonny Gray and Jacques Vermeulen respectively.Gareth Steenson, the club’s record point-scorer, makes his final appearance before joining the coaching staff next season. The Ulsterman has scored 2,630 points in 311 appearances for Exeter and will bow out as a Chiefs legend.Related content: Gareth Steenson walks off into the sunsetDoR Rob Baxter said: “Wasps have been smouldering for a few weeks, sitting there waiting, preparing, getting ready for what in every sense is the biggest game of the season.“In every meeting we’ve told the players we have to make sure we hit the pitch and match Wasps in every area, because they are going to bring a physicality and an intensity that will be right up there. I’d love for the players to round off their season in a special way by producing one of those big Exeter-type performances.”Keepie-uppie: second-row Jonny Hill tries to get control of the ball during Chiefs’ training (Getty Images)Wasps also make four changes from their previous match, the semi-final against Bristol.Tom Willis joins brother Jack in the back row, Jeff Toomaga-Allen and Tom West both start in the front row, and Juan de Jongh pairs up with Gopperth in midfield.Brad Shields, Kieran Brookes, Simon McIntyre and Alfie Barbeary are all unavailable after being ruled out due to contact tracing protocols. Malakai Fekitoa misses out through a groin injury picked up against the Bears.Blackett said: “It hasn’t been ideal preparation but the players have coped with it admirably.“A lot of credit must also go to the staff, especially team manager Dave Bassett, head of medical Ali James and club doctor Ralph Mitchell. The amount of work that they’ve put in behind the scenes to allow us to play this game is phenomenal.“The one thing we spoke about at the start of the season is being adaptable. Now the players will do everything they can to put in a performance. We know it will be tough but we are confident with the form that we can take into the game.”Big day: Lee Blackett leads Wasps into a final for the first time having taken charge in mid-season (Getty)Here are a few more interesting stats about today’s game…* This will be Exeter’s fifth successive Premiership final, and sixth Premiership game at Twickenham. Their sole victory at the venue was that defeat of Wasps in the 2017 final.* Wasps haven’t won the title since 2008, when Exeter were still in the RFU Championship.* Exeter have the best goalkicking success rate (88%) in the Premiership this season, ahead of second-placed Wasps (81%). Individually Gareth Steenson (92%) and Joe Simmonds (89%) have the best rates in the league.* Chiefs full-back Stuart Hogg has averaged 86 metres gained per league match this season – the third-highest figure in the competition.* Wasps scrum-half Dan Robson has had a hand in 20 tries (13 assists, 7 tries) in the Premiership this season, more than any other player. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

EGR fosters conversations about economic inequality

first_img Rector Tampa, FL Tags Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI May 6, 2012 at 10:37 am A thought on this Sunday morning, Friend. I believe we need to ask if poverty of material well-being is much different than poverty of compassion or poverty of education or any of the other poverties we are all heir to?I believe rather than a broad-brush general approach, we need to encounter each person as an individual and realize that both parties have something the other needs and what we may project as the Others need is often a mirror of what we are missing as well? Comments are closed. Occupy Movement Comments (2) Advocacy Peace & Justice, Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Smithfield, NC Press Release Service Director of Music Morristown, NJ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT By Sharon SheridanPosted May 3, 2012 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Albany, NY Marc Kivel says: Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Pittsburgh, PA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Featured Events Jeff Parker says: EGR fosters conversations about economic inequality Going beyond ‘ideological’ or ‘political’ differences In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Curate Diocese of Nebraska May 4, 2012 at 12:17 pm This article and its related discussions is very hard to respond to. I can sympathize with the gentlemen who referred to the visitors as communists. Communism theoretically was about what is now referred to as economic justice. It’s the old discussion of equal results versus equal opportunity. I’m an equal opportunity person, consistent with the US Constitution. It is a political issue– that does not mean that it is at odds with faithful Christian service. Does justice really mean economic equality? I don’t believe so; the real question is what are the conditions at the bottom. I believe the focus should be on the poor, defined as those who lack basics such as shelter, food, clothing, etc., and how can we help to ensure that people don’t fall into this category.“What you do unto the least of them, you do unto me.” That is caring for all of us as God’s children, but is not the same as saying that we all have to have economic equality. I think the phrase economic justice (or environmental justice) is most unfortunate and detracts from the goal of helping our neighbors in need. Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Belleville, IL Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Bath, NC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Youth Minister Lorton, VA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Submit a Job Listing Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Collierville, TN Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem [Episcopal News Service] While the Occupy movement was forming and growing, Episcopalians for Global Reconciliation was discerning its own path toward addressing economic inequality.Previously focused on the U.N. Millennium Development Goals to alleviate extreme global poverty, EGR has begun initiating dialogues at individual congregations on the related economic issues that affect everyone, rich and poor, in the United States as well as overseas.“We felt that the church provided a place where rich and poor could actually maybe try to work on this issue without all the strident polemics around it, the basic belief being that all people, rich and poor, are children of God,” said John Hammock, EGR board co-chair and acting executive director. He also is associate professor of public policy at the Fletcher School at Tufts University in Massachusetts and co-founded the Oxford Poverty and Human Development Initiative at Oxford University.“You focus on anger and fear and scarcity, you’re never going to get anywhere,” he said. “And Christianity is a religion of hope.”Instead, we should focus on the “both/and,” he said. “The United States is still the richest country in the world … Then you can start talking about an economics of reconciliation.”Episcopalian Marisa Egerstrom, a PhD candidate in American civilization at Harvard University, has joined EGR in its new outreach to congregations to facilitate these discussions. Last fall, Egerstrom founded Protest Chaplains to support the Occupy movement, and her work with EGR dovetails with her evolving Occupy efforts.“Where I’ve been spending most of my time [with Occupy] is actually trying to get a more long-term specific campaign off the ground, which I sometimes call the Occupied Church but is really a grassroots effort to organize churches around economic inequality,” she said. EGR has “sort of taken me and this campaign on as a pilot project to see what kind of conversations we can open up in congregations that might not have been possible before the Occupy movement began.”The vision is to create “a larger network of Christians who are deeply grieved by the effects of this rampant economic inequality” and to connect them to local efforts to address economic issues such as hunger, foreclosures or predatory lending, she said. She wants to “shift the paradigm from one of scarcity to justice” and then help people understand that “these aren’t local issues.”“Injustice always happens locally and to individual people, but the ways in which that happens is always national and global and systemic,” she said.“The other goal of this is to teach and encourage folks in congregations to create media around this, to take photos and do videos and to learn how to speak about one’s faith in public again,” she said. “I’ve been saying for a very long time that the only people who will ever be able to counter the ‘religious right’ are other Christians who reclaim our tradition, our speech, our vision of God, and who are willing to express that exploitation and hatred and exclusion are actually not the heart of our tradition, but [rather] this vision of redemption and unlimited grace and a new life.”EGR hired Egerstrom, Hammock said, because she “embodies a new vision of how to engage in this kind of dialogue” on economic inequality.“We have started and will continue to have dialogues in different Episcopal churches on this issue,” he said.The discussions aim to get participants to focus on what the economy means to them and what they as individuals and the church can do – moving beyond prayer and study to action, he said. They held one program at St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church in Boston, then another at Holy Innocents Episcopal Church in Valrico, Florida, where EGR’s board co-chair and treasurer, Archdeacon Emeritus Gary Cartwright, serves. At Holy Innocents, Egerstrom and Hammock led a morning forum and a more focused smaller-group discussion in the afternoon.“It was a very helpful conversation, I think, at several levels,” said the Rev. Doug Scharf, rector. “What was somewhat surprising to me was the personal dimension of our time together, where people were able to express their fears and concerns and hopes based from their own experience.”Holy Innocents supports a range of social programs.“You do all these things for other people outside the church,” Marisa Egerstrom told the congregation. But what if you lost your house or job and couldn’t make ends meet? “Would you feel comfortable coming to your church for help?”In response, she said, “There was this very uncomfortable kind of smile. That was kind of a moment of opening.”She followed with a story from a Boston area rector of parish in a wealthy community. “She said that now she’s got parishioners on food stamps, and they drive 30 miles to go to the grocery store because they don’t want anybody from their church to see them buying groceries with food stamps.”The story addressed the shame people have about not having enough. “It became a way of sort of opening up a conversation that maybe had not been possible before,” Egerstrom said.In inviting EGR to Valrico, Scharf said, “I think the other goal was to kind of see what kind of response we would get to the work of EGR, kind of outside the Boston-New England paradigm. And Southwest Florida, in particular, where I’m doing ministry in eastern Hillsborough County outside of Tampa, [is a] much different context.”“Even the words ‘economic inequality’ were words that for some people had particular political and ideological baggage attached to them,” he said. “And so there was a lot of translation, I think, that had to happen just for people to understand what we were trying to do.”Before they arrived, Egerstrom said, “he was getting some calls from parishioners saying, ‘Who are these communists from Boston you’re bringing down here?’”In their forum presentation, Egerstrom and Hammock showed slides of graphs demonstrating what they meant by economic inequality and how much had changed in the last 30 years. Then they led a meditation to let people identify and “own” their emotional reactions to the material before beginning the conversation, Egerstrom said.The conversation pushed beyond the initial suspicions, she said. “Whether you’re an ‘occupier’ or you want nothing to do with Occupy … we really all just want the same things, and it’s not all that much. We just want to know that we’re going to be able to make a living, to feed our family, to have a decent life where we’re not absolutely struggling all the time.”One of the wardens told them afterward he initially came only to support the deacon but concluded, “This was all right,” Egerstrom said. During the program, “he pushed back. I pushed back. And it was fine.“We all learned that we can have those conversations. It doesn’t need to be an argument when it’s about our shared humanity, our shared vulnerability and ultimately our shared identity in being children of God. If we can get back to that, then any conversation is possible.”As a next step, Holy Innocents is considering using a small-group curriculum from the Boston Faith and Justice Network called Lazarus at the Gate, available as a 12- or eight-week course. That program has “been really powerful for a lot of folks,” Egerstrom said. “They really drastically changed their lives, their spending habits. They looked at the way their church is using money. And it’s very honest.”“I’m hopeful,” Scharf said, “that was we continue to move forward with this small group that maybe we can branch out and do some more forum-type opportunities with the congregation and within our deanery or diocese to continue the dialogue, help people understand that these aren’t liberal-conservative issues or Republican-Democrat issues. We’re trying to find a way to have the conversation as the body of Christ and how we can respond from a place of faith and service and not get caught in those ideological or political differences.”That fits with EGR’s philosophy. “EGR from the very beginning has felt that … the only way you can actually have social transformation is though the spiritual transformation of people,” Hammock said.— Sharon Sheridan is an ENS correspondent. Rector Washington, DC Submit a Press Release Associate Rector Columbus, GA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Hopkinsville, KY Submit an Event Listing The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS last_img read more

Los Angeles diocesan bishop diagnosed with leukemia

first_img Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Washington, DC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Claire Addison says: New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books April 28, 2012 at 10:45 am Prayers go up in Mississippi! Featured Jobs & Calls Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Youth Minister Lorton, VA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 House of Bishops Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Michelle Jarski says: Ernie Telford says: In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 April 27, 2012 at 4:55 pm Dear Bishop Bruno,I am a priest in the Diocese of Iowa and had the joy of meeting you in Des Moines when our own Bishop Alan Scarfe was consecrated. We had a short conversation before the ceremony, but I do not remember what we said and you probably don’t either!! Be that as it may, I am so very sorry to hear of your diagnosis. This Sunday you will be remembered during Prayers of the People at St. Matthew’s-by-the-bridge, Iowa Falls IA, and on succeeding Sundays. May the blessing of God and the love of Jesus and the power of the Spirit continue to be with you in these coming days!Netha + Rector Bath, NC April 27, 2012 at 4:34 pm My prayers, and those of St. Andrew’s Church in Burke, VA, where I serve as interim, are with you and Mary, as always. Blessings for you as you have been to so many. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Martinsville, VA May 3, 2012 at 8:29 pm My dear, beloved Bishop!Know that your humble servant and our St. Luke’s, Monrovia parish, just around the corner from you at City of Hope in Duarte , is praying for you daily. We are certain that the energy from each and every one of those healing prayers is “very powerful.” (James 5:15-16). We pray that they have great effect in your treatment and healing process. Love and prayers, John+ and Flock Tags Featured Events Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Submit an Event Listing Health & Healthcare, The Rev. Lucretia Jevne says: Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL The Rev. Martha Frances says: May 1, 2012 at 10:33 am Jon, What a bummer! You will be in my and Joye’s prayers. Bill Pregnall April 27, 2012 at 6:58 pm My thoughts and prayers are with you and your family. May God’s peace and grace be with you all. Walter Brownridge says: April 28, 2012 at 3:48 pm Jon: Our prayers are with you. We have known each other for years–since Thousand Oaks–so I have always called you a dear friend. May the Lord bring great healing…Al and Stephanie Smith in retirement–San Diego. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME The Rev. Kathryn Macek says: April 27, 2012 at 1:32 pm Our prayers are with you, Bishop Bruno. May 4, 2012 at 5:09 pm BELOVED BISHOP JON,THE LORD IS WITH YOU. THE DIOCESE OF THE RIO GRANDE RAISES ITS PRAYERS TO THE LORD FOR YOUR FULL HEALING AND RECOVERY. WE SEND YOU OUR LOVE . KEEP FIRM IN YOUR COURAGEOUS AND HOPE-FILLED FAITH. Rector Collierville, TN The Rev. Netha N. Brada+ says: Alfred Smith says: Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Smithfield, NC April 28, 2012 at 4:59 pm Dear +Bp. Bruno, Ever since you visited my new assignment to Lord of the Streets mission to the homeless in Houston’s midtown in 2000, I have admired your ministry & leadership, & my 3 subsequent visits to the Diocese of LA (Jubilee Ministries’ conference & 2 Kaleidoscope training weeks with Eric Law) have reaffirmed what an extraordinary person & bishop you are. Now I read with grief of your diagnosis & pray fervently for your return to the best of health. May your mourning be turned into dancing as God gives you new blessings in the midst of your dark days. Prayers always, Martha Frances+ Bill Pregnall says: Press Release Service Gary Goldacker says: Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Sabrina Nealy says: April 28, 2012 at 7:48 am Jack and I send our prayers from Chestertown – for you and Mary (and +Mary and +Diane and staff). We, too, will make sure you’re on our parish prayer list (St. Paul’s, Kent). No doubt the Cathedral of the Incarnation in Baltimore – as ell as St. Luke’s, Carey Street (where Van+ is currently serving) – will do the same.Ultreya! Rev. Dr. Kesner Ajax Diocese of Haiti Partnership program says: Rector Shreveport, LA [Episcopal Diocese of Los Angeles] The diocesan community stands in prayer with Bishop J. Jon Bruno who on April 26 received a diagnosis of acute monocytic leukemia. He will begin treatment immediately. Bishop Bruno has issued a statement to the diocesan community.The full text is below.______________________________________________________________________________April 26, 2012My dear friends,As we move close to the 12th anniversary of my consecration on April 29, I am looking forward to the future, yet any time we make too many plans, we have to wait and listen for God.Having had what I thought was a bout of pneumonia since the House of Bishops last met in March, I have gone back into the hospital to determine what this nagging problem has been.With the great assistance of Dr. David Cannom of Los Angeles Cardiology Associates, Dr. Glenn Hatfield of The Medical Group, Dr. Lasika Senevirante of the Los Angeles Cancer Network, and the staff of Good Samaritan Hospital, I have discovered that this nagging problem is more than I thought it was. But I have been convinced by Dr. Cannom and Dr. Senevirante that I am too stubborn to let this go by the wayside, so we will start immediately to begin aggressive treatment for Acute Monocytic Leukemia (AML M5).I don’t do anything lightly, and I am never surprised that when God calls me, it is to do more than I asked or thought. The doctors are of a mind that we can beat this, but I want to be honest with you: I am frightened. Not unlike the amputation, or the metabolic staph infection (MRSA) that I experienced, or the court cases, a few challenges have come across our path.I want you folks to be as positive as you can be, and I need your prayers and support at this time. I want you to know that I have raised all of these concerns with my colleague Bishops, Diane Jardine Bruce and Mary Douglas Glasspool.I will continue to serve as Bishop of the Diocese of Los Angeles with the able assistance of the Bishops Suffragan and the Executive Staff. I, together with Bishops Bruce and Glasspool, Canon David Tumilty, the Rev. Canon Joanna Satorius and Canon Robert Williams will continue to be the management team of the Diocese.This will require some changes for us to continue to serve you in the life of this Diocese, and we will remain faithful. We will not hold things back from you, and we will remain in regular communication.If it should be that my health does take a turn for the worse, I will do what is needed to accomplish the election of the next Diocesan Bishop. I have notified Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori, Bishop Stacy Sauls, and the Rev. Canon Chuck Robertson, and they have all assured me that they will do all they can to be of assistance.I want to assure you all of the depth of love, respect and grace that I feel from this Diocese each day of my life. My love to you, my appreciation, and forever my dedication.Yours in Christ,+ J. Jon BrunoSixth Bishop of Los Angeles An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET April 27, 2012 at 5:48 pm My prayers and that of my congregation, St. Luke’s, Calistoga will be with you and your family and those treating you. May you constantly feel and experience the presence of the Good Shepherd as you walk through this valley of the shadow. martha knight says: April 28, 2012 at 11:26 am Dear Bishop Bruno, My prayers are with you and for you, as a Daughter of the King I know the power of prayer. Miracles happen every day. FHS. Michelle Jarski. The Very Reverend Bruce McMillan says: Bishop Michael Vono says: May 2, 2012 at 6:02 pm You have been in struggles before. Keep on keeping on. God bless. Jack and Linda May 2, 2012 at 7:41 am Dear Bishop Bruno,We are praying for you in Haiti.Rev.Dr. Kesner Ajax Submit a Press Release Robert W Kley says: An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Frank Bergen says: The Rev. Morris Hauge says: Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Los Angeles diocesan bishop diagnosed with leukemia Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Posted Apr 27, 2012 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ JackMMcKelvey says: April 27, 2012 at 4:45 pm Dear Bishop Bruno:We pray for God’s healing grace and touch upon you and for your complete recovery. He is faithful.We pray for His guidance upon your doctors and all health professionals as you begin the process.Remember that the longest journey begins with the first step. Keep your chin up, Bishop, and smile. Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Knoxville, TN May 3, 2012 at 10:42 am Dear Jon,Pat and I thinking about you and praying for your recovery daily.Ernie & Pat TelfordSt. Patrick’sThousand Oaks, CA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Camilla Pulatie says: Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Director of Music Morristown, NJ May 1, 2012 at 1:57 pm Dear Bishop Bruno,My prayers are with you and your family.Sabrina NealyOffice for Transition Ministry Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Tampa, FL michael Neal says: Comments (29) Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET April 27, 2012 at 4:36 pm Our prayers are with you and the churches in your diocese. Rector Pittsburgh, PA Neil and Pauline Maxwell says: Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ April 27, 2012 at 4:56 pm I am deeply saddened by this news. I raise up my prayers for you and your wife and family and those who are on your medical team. God’s love to you. Fr John Crean says: May 1, 2012 at 12:57 pm Dear +Bp. Bruno-Know that you are in my prayers as well. Comments are closed. Comments navigation Newer comments Comments navigation Newer comments Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY April 27, 2012 at 3:53 pm Dear Bishop Bruno,It is with sadness that we read of your illness,and we will of course be praying for you.We remember fondly spending time with you in Ireland on The Compass Rose visit, a few years ago. Your sermon on the Sunday at Christ Church Cathedral was truly memorable.Our warmest wishes and prayers to you and Mary.Very sincerely,Pauline and Neil Maxwell (Canada) Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA April 27, 2012 at 5:12 pm Jon and Mary, be assured that God is with you, and you will have a special place in our prayers. Shalom, Pat and Frank Bergen, Tucson Rector Albany, NY April 28, 2012 at 1:10 am Having met you at St. Mary’s Church (Eugene, OR) many years ago, I have followed your journey of faith and service with admiration! You are in my prayers, and as Dame Julian wrote so many centuries ago, “…all will be well”. It is a promise of God’s Presence with us – no matter what unfolds.Blessings Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Fr. E. Ulric C-Jones says: Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs April 27, 2012 at 8:51 pm Our prayers go out to you Bishop Jon. Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Mary Grace (M.G.) Brosius says: April 27, 2012 at 4:44 pm Bishop Bruno, as former residents of the diocese, currently residing in Upper South Carolina, we read with dread your news. I will put you on our parish prayer list as well as our own. Your ministry is a blessing to the diocese and we all pray that your healing will allow you to continue your amazing work for the people of the diocese and all the people of Los Angeles.God be with you in your fight!Claire and Pete Addison April 27, 2012 at 6:30 pm Dear Bishop Bruno,My thoughts and prayers are with you and your family as you face this next challenge. May God’s peace and comfort surround you and may you find strength in knowing that God walks this journey with you. Rector Belleville, IL Ginger Hanning says: Submit a Job Listing Associate Rector Columbus, GAlast_img read more

Evangelism: Telling Stories

first_img Rector Washington, DC By Jason EvansPosted Dec 10, 2012 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Pierre Whalon says: Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Hopkinsville, KY This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Tampa, FL New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Collierville, TN Rector Pittsburgh, PA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Evangelism Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Fr. Michael Neal says: Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Featured Jobs & Calls Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET [Episcopal Diocese of Washington] In an increasingly diverse western world, Christians often shy away from articulating our religious distinctives. We are appropriately aware of our history of forcing religion on others. Yet, in such a context this often leaves us the least compelling voice. And if we believe there is yet good news in the Christian message, than we ought to find our voice again. What if there was a way to talk about our faith that respected others while calling out the good news of God in the world?Several years ago, I was sitting in the small apartment of a Somali friend. We had become friends through the after school homework club for refugees I volunteered with. My friend was sharing with me the history of his people. He told me of long journeys from one part of Africa to another. He told me of his ancestors being enslaved and subjected to diaspora amongst morepowerful tribes. He shared what his ancestors did to keep their cultural distinctive alive while living amidst other cultures. I couldn’t help but notice the similarities between his cultural history and that of Israel found in the Old Testament. I shared this with him and this led to a conversation about the Jesus of the Gospels and the Isa of the Quran.The kind of evangelism that’s going to work in this day and age has a lot to do with stories. Stories are powerful things. They bind us together. They shape how we live our lives. But as I said before, evangelism begins with listening. We don’t earn the right to tell our stories without first listening to those of others. When we do this, we begin to see where our stories cross paths with others, just as it did with my refugee friend’s and my own. Consider the story of Jesus and the Samaritan woman at a well, or Paul and the people of Athens. Both Jesus and Paul find common ground as a starting point.We often think about evangelism as a debate; we start with what’s different and then attempt to convince another that we’re right. But what if evangelism was the term used to describe the conversation in which we acknowledge God showing up in our lives? One may think, “That’s much easier!” Yet, this approach still assumes that we are in relationship with others outside of our religious traditions and willing to talk about faith. If we are willing to do those things, I think you will discover that when we find common ground, we learn something about God we did not know before.Throughout the Old and New Testaments, it is the case that “the outsider” shapes the faith of “the insider.” As you read through the narrative of Scripture, you can see God’s people equally shaped by and shaping the faith of those around them. I hadn’t set out to convert my Muslim friend. But I think both of us were converted that day. We both learned something about a God much bigger than the limits our traditions. My friend learned more about Isa, Jesus, than he had known before. And I will never forget his curiosity as to why Christians’ lifestyles did not seem to reflect their faith. More on that in the next post.— Jason Evans is the young adult missioner for the Episcopal Diocese of Washington. His posts on evangelism will continue weekly throughout Advent 2012. Join an online discussion of this series on the diocesan Facebook page. Comments (5) Rector Smithfield, NC Press Release Service Submit a Press Release Rector Martinsville, VA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Comments are closed. Gregory Bezilla says: December 11, 2012 at 3:20 am I certainly have learned a lot more about our God through such conversations, as well.My reply to your friend’s question about practicing what we preach also applies to people of other religions… Submit an Event Listing Featured Events Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Jason Evans says: An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC December 11, 2012 at 7:08 am Our Canterbury House was visited several times by a Muslim student, who explained that he wanted to explore whether he was a Muslim because he was born to Muslim parents or because of faith. We listened to his questions about Christianity, and in turn he listened to our questions about Islam. We learned from the other’s questions and answers. The student later complimented us for speaking from our Christian tradition without downplaying or disguising our differences; he said that he felt that other Christian places he had worshipped were dishonest, because they weren’t willing to engage the differences between the two religions. The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Evangelism: Telling Stories Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL December 12, 2012 at 7:43 pm Wow! That’s powerful stuff, Gregory. Thanks for sharing. Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Shreveport, LA Director of Music Morristown, NJ December 10, 2012 at 3:20 pm Thanks, Fr. Michael! Rector Albany, NY Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Tags Advent, December 10, 2012 at 1:09 pm Good story……………………………:) Jason Evans says: Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Submit a Job Listing In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Rector Columbus, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Knoxville, TN Youth Minister Lorton, VA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Belleville, IL last_img read more

‘The end is where we start from’

first_img Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Events Tags Submit a Press Release Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Posted Feb 14, 2013 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 House of Deputies, Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs [Episcopal Church House of Deputies] On February 14, House of Deputies President Gay Clark Jennings gave these remarks at the first meeting of the Task Force on Church Structural Reform created by General Convention Resolution 2012-C095:As I’ve been preparing for this meeting, I’ve been thinking about the words of a good Anglican named T.S. Eliot. In the “Dry Salvages,” one of the Four Quartets, he wrote “What we call the beginning is often the end. And to make an end is to make a beginning. The end is where we start from.”Welcome to the end of the great Episcopal Church structure debate of 2011-2012. We have arrived here, in part, through a politically fraught process that no one would recommend or seek to replicate. As so often happens, however, the Holy Spirit showed up and worked through our legislative process at General Convention. The result was a rare unanimous vote in both the House of Deputies and the House of Bishops for Resolution C095. The first clause of that resolution, which created this task force, says:Resolved, That this General Convention believes the Holy Spirit is urging The Episcopal Church to reimagine itself, so that, grounded in our rich heritage and yet open to our creative future, we may more faithfully:• Proclaim the Good News of the Kingdom• Teach, baptize and nurture new believers• Respond to human need by loving service• Seek to transform unjust structures of society• Strive to safeguard the integrity of creation and sustain and renew the life of the earth.Put simply, we are longing to be changed from glory into glory. So this is your starting point. What it lacks in specificity it makes up for in faithfulness.Because we got here the way we did, we don’t yet have some things that you’ll need to accomplish the work you are charged to do between now and November 2014, when your report is due. Don’t worry: You have some of the sharpest, most creative minds I know in this room, and you’ll be able to make up ground quickly and collaboratively. But here are some fundamentals you’ll want to consider as you figure out how to get the job done:We don’t have agreement on what we mean when we say we intend to reimagine “The Episcopal Church” and reform our “structures, governance and administration.” Are we speaking of the corporate structure of the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society? Our diocesan and provincial structures? The General Convention? Executive Council? Theological education? Committees, commissions, agencies and boards? Congregations? It is up to you to define the scope of what you will seek to restructure.We don’t have a common vocabulary. Those of you who played Bonnie Ball in the House of Deputies last summer remember the points you scored for using buzzwords like “nimble,” “flexible” and “creative.” The game was a blast, but jargon clouds meaning, as any of you who have read General Ordination Exams know all too well. I urge you to spend time developing a clear, common vocabulary to use when you communicate with one another and with the whole church—which you are charged to do “frequently” by Resolution C095.Most of all, we have a lot of unquestioned assumptions and not much data—especially about the energetic, active, Spirit-led mission and ministries that are happening all over the grassroots of this church. As the president of the House of Deputies, which has nearly 900 members, I’m privileged to hear from a lot of laypeople and clergy, particularly young people, who are planting congregations, organizing communities, advocating for justice, and reinventing church. They have remarkably little need for, or interest in, traditional top-down governance structures more suited to the world of Mad Men than Modern Family. Any new structure worth having will need to harness their commitment to the Gospel, their passion for mission, and their energy and creativity.Resolution C095 gives you the mandate you need to gather the information and ask for the prayers you will need:Resolved, That, in order to be informed by the wisdom, expertise, and commitment of the whole body of the Church, the Task Force shall gather information and ideas from congregations, dioceses and provinces, and other interested individuals and organizations, including those not often heard from; engage other resources to provide information and guidance, and shall invite all these constituencies to be joined in prayer as they engage in this common work of discernment.I want to commend to you one more resolved clause of your enabling resolution. You won’t be surprised that it is near and dear to me:Resolved, That this Task Force shall be accountable directly to the General Convention, and independent of other governing structures, to maintain a high degree of autonomy.You are no one’s agents; no one’s surrogates, and the credibility of this endeavor depends on your conducting your work accordingly.There’s a lot at stake for many faithful people in the restructuring of The Episcopal Church, because the end that we are starting from is the end of the institutional church as we have known it. You’ve been called to guide the church as we begin anew, and you have been given the independence and autonomy you will need to keep the understandable and unavoidable fear, anxiety and grief at bay and give us all “a future with hope.” (Jeremiah 29:11, as quoted in Resolution C095).I will wait with great interest as you lead us in welcoming and engaging changing realities, emerging networks, flattening hierarchies, rapidly changing media, amazing new technologies, and new ideas about what community means. We are all praying for you.Let us pray:O God of unchangeable power and eternal light: Look favorably on your whole Church, that wonderful and sacred mystery; by the effectual working of your providence, carry out in tranquility the plan of salvation; let the whole world see and know that things which were cast down are being raised up, and things which had grown old are being made new, and that all things are being brought to their perfection by him through whom all things were made, your Son Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen. (Book of Common Prayer 280, 291) Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Albany, NY Rector Martinsville, VA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Submit a Job Listing Curate Diocese of Nebraska Submit an Event Listingcenter_img New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Collierville, TN Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Press Release Service President of the House of Deputies, Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Featured Jobs & Calls Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC ‘The end is where we start from’ Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Bath, NC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Pittsburgh, PA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Director of Music Morristown, NJ Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Tampa, FL Rector Belleville, IL Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Washington, DC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Structure last_img read more

Episcopal deacon’s ministry, photography serves Cleveland’s homeless

first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group By Megan Crow BrauerPosted Jul 9, 2015 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Belleville, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Washington, DC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Martinsville, VA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Youth Minister Lorton, VA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Tampa, FL Rector Pittsburgh, PA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Portrait of Robert Moncrief by Lydia Bailey[Lutheran Metropolitan Ministry] In June 2013, the Rev. Lydia Bailey was ordained to the Sacred Order of Deacons at Trinity Episcopal Cathedral in Cleveland, Ohio. However, Bailey’s ministry began long before then. In 2007, she became the volunteer coordinator at the 2100 Lakeside Men’s Shelter, operated by Lutheran Metropolitan Ministry. The shelter is the largest shelter in Ohio, serving 4,000 men who are homeless each year. Bailey organizes volunteers by the thousands – to be precise, 1,773 individual volunteers last year alone. Bailey oversees these people as they not only serve meals, but operate programs including job coaching, poetry, gardening, Bible study and legal clinic.In the midst of it all, Bailey manages to moonlight as a photographer. In 2010, her photos of the residents culminated in a full-blown art exhibit complemented by the men’s personal stories in their own words called “Portraits of Homelessness.”Portrait of Eric Asazawa by Lydia BaileyThe ministry’s exhibit is aimed at not only breaking stereotypes of those who are homeless, but moving the public toward a more committed stance on issues of homelessness. The collection of 45 portraits, which has shown in 35 venues around Northeast Ohio, conveys individuals with concerns and hopes; their gifts and personalities as well as the confusing, fearful and damaging elements of homelessness.According to Lutheran Metropolitan Ministry President and CEO Andrew Genszler, “We live in a moment of national apathy and cynicism and this public attitude makes Lydia’s ability to engage others and build meaningful relationships all the more remarkable. Her ministry is an asset to LMM and a beautiful bright space in our community.”Portrait of Charles Young by Lydia BaileyBailey’s powerful ministry has inspired others in many ways. Portraits of Homelessness, while on display at Cleveland’s Temple Tifereth, was a subject of discussion among the young adult classes. The youth commented that the shelter residents they saw portrayed in the exhibit couldn’t be homeless; they looked too “alive,” “vital,” or “happy.” Thereafter, the students collected their babysitting money and donated it to the shelter.Portrait of Raymel Johnson by Lydia Bailey“I think a lot of people have been struck by the humanity of people here,” said Bailey. “Portraits of Homelessness is about growing awareness, to see the individuals involved in homelessness, beyond the stereotypes. And while there is nothing quite so terrible as homelessness, these portraits can be empowering to those who feel largely invisible; who feel lost living in a shelter and on the street. Stories can be empowering, giving voice to the deepest hopes and concerns of individuals.”According to Michael Sering, Lutheran Metropolitan Ministry’s vice president, housing and shelter, “In these portraits of homelessness we can see a powerful microcosm of humanity and society – strength and frailty, brokenness and resilience, hope and sorrow, and indeed potential.”Funding for Portraits of Homelessness was provided by The Dominion Foundation and Community West Foundation.— Megan Crow Brauer is associate vice president for development and communications at Lutheran Metropolitan Ministry Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Featured Jobs & Calls Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Smithfield, NC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Submit an Event Listing Rector Shreveport, LA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Albany, NY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing Submit a Press Release Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Associate Rector Columbus, GA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Press Release Service Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Bath, NC Episcopal deacon’s ministry, photography serves Cleveland’s homeless Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Featured Events Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Director of Music Morristown, NJlast_img read more