Liberal MP who weathered gunregistry fight not worried about new firearms bill

first_imgOTTAWA – He’s the Liberal MP for a large, rural Ontario riding with lots of gun owners, but Bob Nault says he is not worried about a voter backlash over the government’s new firearms bill.The Conservatives say the legislation would unfairly target law-abiding hunters and target shooters with fresh measures.Nault, however, sees nothing in the bill that could stir up the sort of controversy that erupted over the universal long-gun registry in the 1990s — a fight he remembers well.The latest legislation will have no major impacts on legitimate firearms owners, Nault, 62, said in an interview. “I think this is going to be put to bed fairly quickly.”Not if the Conservatives have any sway.Since the bill’s introduction last month, Tory MPs have called the move to tighten controls on the sale and tracking of firearms the creation of a new national long-gun registry.The bill would require retailers to keep records of firearms inventory and sales for at least 20 years, a measure intended to assist police in investigating gun trafficking and other crimes. It would also require a gun seller to ensure a buyer’s licence is valid prior to the transaction.“By going to the store level as opposed to the home, the Liberals are trying to bring in the registry by a back door,” Conservative MP Erin O’Toole said in the House of Commons. “In several Parliaments in the past we saw that it did not work, it did not hit crime, it cost hundreds of millions of dollars and it targeted law-abiding people as opposed to lawbreakers.”The Conservative government dismantled the long-gun registry, a Liberal initiative that mushroomed into a costly computer boondoggle and stoked resentment in the firearms community.The Liberals are quick to note the new plan to require commercial retailers to keep sales records would revive a measure that existed from 1979 until 1995, when universal registration of guns essentially replaced the store ledgers. Most merchants already record sales for safety and liability reasons and because it affects their insurance, the Liberals say.As for greater scrutiny of sales, it’s the buyer’s licence, not the gun, that’s being verified, and no information about the firearm is exchanged, they add.The Conservatives are using the firearms bill as “a wedge issue” to capitalize on the wariness of rural residents, said Nault, who won the northern Ontario riding of Kenora by just 498 votes in the 2015 election.But he prefers to view the latest federal effort to control firearms as one step on a long path that stretches back to the late 19th century.Nault, a gun owner whose father taught him to shoot as a youngster, was one of the MPs who provided advice to the government about what the Liberal caucus was hearing in the mid-1990s as Allan Rock, then justice minister, pushed ahead with the long-gun registry.The current bill is nowhere near as far-reaching, Nault said. As of late last week, he had heard from 45 constituents with concerns about the legislation in his sprawling riding that covers one-third of the province.Among the reservations: a measure that would restore the authority of RCMP experts to classify firearms without political influence, repealing cabinet’s authority to overrule Mountie determinations, and another that would roll back some automatic authorizations to transport restricted and prohibited firearms, such as handguns and assault weapons.“As I’ve said to my colleagues, of course we’ll lose some votes in rural Canada, because whenever you talk about firearms, people naturally get upset about it,” Nault said.But he insisted the bill is “quite balanced” and will have “virtually no impact” on 98 per cent of gun owners.He stressed the importance of a provision that would expand the scope of background checks on those who want to acquire a gun. Instead of just the five years immediately preceding a licence application, personal history questions would cover a person’s entire lifetime.“In Canada, owning a firearm is a privilege, not a right,” Nault said.“Hopefully people will start to see this more as a non-partisan issue.”— Follow @JimBronskill on Twitterlast_img read more

Jim Belushi And The Sacred Hearts To Perform At American Indian College

first_imgThe American Indian College Fund (the College Fund) has signed Jim Belushi and The Sacred Hearts to perform live at its 25th Anniversary Gala, to be held Friday, May 8 from 6:30-10:30 p.m. at the legendary Drake Hotel.The formal fundraising event will benefit Native American higher education and celebrate the College Fund’s mission to provide access to higher education for all Native people.VIP ticket-holders will enjoy a special reception and the opportunity to meet Jim Belushi.A silent auction featuring Native art and unique items will also be held at the event. In addition, the College Fund will be accepting bids for a guest to perform the song “Soul Man” with Jim Belushi and The Sacred Hearts that evening.All VIP packages, tickets, individual tickets, tables, and sponsorships are available for purchase now. Visit collegefund.org/gala to learn more or call 303-426-8900.25th Anniversary event sponsors include Toyota Motor Sales USA, Inc.; Comcast NBCUNIVERSAL; Wieden+Kennedy; Ford Foundation; San Manuel Band of Mission Indians; The Walt Disney Company; AT&T; and McDonald’s Corporation.
The American Indian College Fund (the College Fund) is the nation’s largest private provider of scholarships for Native American and Alaska Native students. Founded in 1989, the College Fund has been “Educating the Mind and Spirit” of Native people for 25 years and provides an average of 6,000 scholarships annually. The College Fund also supports the nation’s 34 accredited tribal colleges and universities located on 77 campuses on or near Indian reservations. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators. For more information, please visit www.collegefund.org.last_img read more

Bannock hunting and baby formula now part of Nutrition North

first_imgNutrition North has long been criticized for the way it works; paying retailers to lower their prices through a shipping subsidy instead of going directly to families.It replaced the Food Mail program in 2011, which retailers disliked.Now more food and non-food items will be eligible for the freight subsidy, Jones said. And there will be more ways to pay instead of only with credit cards.Jones said in exchange the government wants better reporting from retailers on how the subsidy is being applied.And consumers want to see that, too, she said, on receipts from more stores.But Nunavut premier Joe Savikataaq said giving retailers more subsidy money wouldn’t guarantee better prices.“We would like to see more direct benefit and subsidy to Nunavummiut,” he said in a release.And Nunavut should have “a dedicated presence” on the program’s advisory board, the premier added.Food reformThis is the Liberal government’s first major overhaul of Nutrition North after it held public hearings into the plan in 2016.Jones said her party will bump the program’s budget to $14 million and add a harvesters’ support grant program to help cushion the high cost of hunting.Food insecurity is a huge issue in northern and remote communities, where there is usually only one major supermarket.Retailers say shipping – mostly by air – jacks up the prices while consumers wonder why junk food is priced much lower than healthy goods.As a result, diets are poor and can lead to health problems.Something Nutrition North is supposed to address but often misses the mark, as APTN Investigates revealed in this documentary.“Nearly 70 per cent of Inuit households in Nunavut are food insecure,” said Aluki Kotierk, president of Inuit rights group Nunavut Tunngavik Inc.“Inuit children are living in food insecure households at a rate eight times the national average, among the highest documented food insecurity rate for an Indigenous population in a developed country.”Kotierk said adding money to offset the high cost of hunting country food would help many families.“It is a necessary and integral part of Inuit culture,” she said in a release.“It is our safety net, at a time of major social changes.”kmartens@aptn.ca@katmarte Ingredients to make bannock to be included in Nutrition North program. (APTN file)Kathleen MartensAPTN NewsThe Trudeau government is trying to make Nutrition North more palatable.It announced updates Monday to the remote and northern food subsidy program developed by the Harper government, including bannock-making ingredients.“Our government firmly believes that policy created with Northerners, for Northerners is the most effective,” said Labrador Lib-MP Yvonne Jones in Iqaluit.“The changes to the subsidy rates and the food eligibility list announced today reflect what we have heard from Northerners about how we can better help them access healthy foods.”Jones, parliamentary secretary to the minister of intergovernmental and northern affairs and internal trade, said more groceries, along with baby formula, would be added to the list of products subsidized under the program after complaints from consumers.Frozen fruits and vegetables, infant food and formula, spaghetti, macaroni and dried beans will be covered under the expanded formula starting January 2019.The complete list is here: Nutrition NorthWatch Kent Driscoll’s story on Nutrition Northlast_img read more

Syracuse profits by handwriting thousands of latetax notes

first_imgALBANY, N.Y. — A city in New York state has found a novel way of motivating residents to pay their back taxes: personal notes handwritten by city officials.The idea stemmed from an experiment on late-tax payments, in which the city of Syracuse partnered with researchers at Syracuse University. City officials wrote and signed thousands of notes by hand, rather than sending standard legal letters demanding payment.The result was the city collecting nearly $1.5 million more than it predicted traditional methods alone would have brought in. University researchers estimate that the personal approach brought in 57 per cent more revenue from delinquent property owners than the city could expect from using more traditional letters.The notes took a less threatening approach, focusing on steps the resident could take to avoid late penalties or legal action. Instead of being addressed “dear property owner,” the notes were all personally addressed to the resident. Each had a brief, handwritten message on the outside of the envelope as well, researchers said.“It’s the kind of positive outcome that occurs when you aren’t afraid to try something new,” Syracuse Mayor Ben Walsh said in a statement.Collecting late taxes is a big challenge for many cities, which often use computer-generated letters to residents threatening action if the money isn’t paid. The researchers said the experiment could have broad applications to a number of different government services. The researchers said they aren’t aware of any other city in the U.S. using the personalized note method to collect taxes.“These are small, simple changes that can have huge payoffs,” said Leonard Lapoo, a Syracuse professor and director and co-founder of Maxwell X Lab, a behavioural research centre at Syracuse University’s Maxwell School.The lab’s managing director, Joe Boskovski, called the experiment common sense, saying treating people as humans can yield results.The findings were first reported by The Associated Press. City officials announced them publicly on Tuesday.David Klepper, The Associated Presslast_img read more

Financial and industrials weigh on TSX loonie climbs against US dollar

first_imgTORONTO — The key financial and industrial sectors weighed on Canada’s main stock index in late-morning trading, while the loonie traded higher against the U.S. dollar.The S&P/TSX composite index was down 13.91 points at 15,130.97.In New York, the Dow Jones industrial average was up 50.84 points at 25,340.11. The S&P 500 index was down 0.59 of a point at 2,729.61, while the Nasdaq composite was down 37.52 points at 7,221.51.The Canadian dollar traded higher at 76.10 cents US compared with an average of 75.75 cents US on Thursday.The January crude contract was up US$1.19 at US$57.87 per barrel and the December natural gas contract was up 18.6 cents at US$4.22 per mmBTU.The December gold contract was up US$6.50 at US$1,221.50 an ounce and the December copper contract was up 2.15 cents at US$2.77 a pound.The Canadian Presslast_img read more

Officials close Muskoseepi Park in Grande Prairie due to flash flooding

first_imgGRANDE PRAIRIE, A.B. – Muskoseepi Park in Grande Prairie has been evacuated and closed until further notice. Many paths are under water and creek banks and slopes are extremely unstable.The public is urged to stay away from the Bear Creek corridor and Muskoseepi Park.Vehicular bridges crossing Bear Creek are safe for travel.Releasing the water at a higher than normal rate through the spillway has protected the dam. It has also lowered water levels in the reservoir but increased water flows downstream. Muskoseepi Park will remain closed until water recedes and a thorough damage assessment can be completed. Pedestrian bridges, paths, creek banks, and other park infrastructure will be inspected for safety before the park is reopened.Crews will be monitoring water levels to protect critical infrastructure throughout the corridor.RCMP and Enforcement Services will be monitoring the park.At this time no properties have been damaged. Residents are asked to obey signs, barricades and the direction of local authorities.last_img read more

Trio accused of murdering Prince George man make court appearance

first_imgBonin’s body was discovered on a forest service road north of Hope in the Fraser Valley on the morning of April 20th, 2017. The Integrated Homicide Investigation Team was called in to take over the investigation after Bonin’s death was deemed suspicious. After a nine-month investigation, IHIT announced in January that charges have been laid in connection with Bonin’s death.An arraignment hearing was scheduled for July 9th.With files from The Abbotsford News: https://www.abbynews.com/news/b-c-men-accused-in-alberta-mans-murder-appears-in-court/ KELOWNA, B.C. – Three men from B.C., one of whom is from Dawson Creek, appeared in a Kelowna courtroom today for a pre-trial hearing.According to The Abbotsford News, 27-year-old Dawson Creek resident Jared Jorgenson, 26-year-old Vancouver resident Ryan Watt, and 20-year-old Joshua Fleurant of Prince George appeared in B.C. Supreme Court via video link to schedule an arraignment hearing. The three have each been charged with first-degree murder in connection with the death of 20-year-old Michael Bonin.Bonin, who is originally from Prince George but was most recently living in Rycroft, was previously known to both the three accused and to police. Court records show that both Bonin and Fleurant were charged with stealing a car in Kamloops on March 31st last year.last_img read more

Tobacco sale ban below 21 may prevent new smokers

first_imgRaising the legal age for tobacco purchase from 18 to 21 years is likely to reduce smoking rates in young people and make the generation smoke-free, experts suggest. Most smokers start smoking during childhood and two-thirds of those who try smoking early will become regular smokers later, said the study published in The BMJ. Increasing the legal age to 21 would make it harder for children to obtain cigarettes and take the legal age beyond school age, said Nicholas Hopkinson, respiratory specialist from the Imperial College London. “Smoking is a contagious habit transmitted within peer groups, and the age increase will protect younger children from exposure to older pupils in school who smoke. It will also remove a potential source of supply within schools,” said Hopkinson. He stressed that besides helping existing smokers to quit, preventing young people from taking to smoking is imperative. Hopkinson also suggested that a “polluter pays” tax set to raise around $198 million per year from tobacco manufacturers will help to pay for a revitalised, evidence-based set of tobacco control policies.last_img read more

How Your Favorite Baseball Team Blows Its Money

For an article on FiveThirtyEight today, Mike Lopez and Noah Davis charted the relationship between spending and win percentage for every baseball season since 1985. They found that the relationship between money and winning in baseball is as strong now as it’s been any time in the free-agency era. Below you’ll see that relationship for each team in the majors. Each season is one dot in the figure, and the colored line is a smoothed curve fit through the points. Essentially, the higher the curve, the more the team’s money was well-spent. The gray line is an aggregation of all the data points across the entire league, and that line shows a pattern: More money generally means more wins.Read more: Don’t Be Fooled By Baseball’s Small-Budget Success Stories » read more

Joe Barton on his management career

first_imgJoey Barton officially retired from playing football in the summer but has revealed he’d been planning to enter management for years.Fleetwood Town manager Joey Barton discussed quitting football and the first steps he took towards management.“For me it has been a case of years of thinking, planning and anticipating what you were going to do coming to fruition,” he told Sky Sports.“And then all those best-laid plans going right out the window!“Everything you think you’ll face you do and then more, but it has been really enjoyable and every day is a real learning experience.“I don’t think anything can ever prepare you for it. It’s a role that varies from club to club and you can have all manner of things going on in any given day.“You really have to think about the ramifications of any decision or any interaction.”LEICESTER, ENGLAND - AUGUST 28: Joey Barton, Manager of Fleetwood Town reacts during the Carabao Cup Second Round match between Leicester City and Fleetwood Town at The King Power Stadium on August 28, 2018 in Leicester, England. (Photo by Michael Regan/Getty Images)Joey Barton remembers those four years he played for Newcastle Manuel R. Medina – April 30, 2019 The English midfielder talked how he was signed by owner Mike Ashley and how he was frustrated after a while with the Magpies.It has been a good start to life as a manager for Barton. Fleetwood Town are 12th in the League One table. And the for the rookie manager, it’s been a learning curve as their form has tailed off in the last few weeks.“Getting the job was a case of timing and opportunity,” Barton said. “Fleetwood were changing managers and wanted to speak with me, and I couldn’t refuse that opportunity.“It has been a bit of a baptism of fire because I didn’t really know much about the level and there were a lot of grounds I hadn’t visited before this season.“But it’s the perfect breeding ground for me and a place where I know I can fulfill my potential.“It’s enough out of the spotlight to be able to make mistakes and learn from them, while also not getting too much praise when you do really get it right.”last_img read more

4 Factors Behind Kashmere Highs Expected Passing State Grade

first_img Listen 00:00 /04:10 To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: Laura Isensee/Houston Public MediaTeachers and administrators at Kashmere High are focused on turning the school around this year and getting off the state’s list of struggling schools.The Texas Education Agency keeps a list of schools that must improve academically or face tough penalties. The school that’s been on that “failing” list the longest: the historically black Kashmere High School in northeast Houston.It hasn’t passed the state’s accountability system for over a decade. But that may change very soon. Before the summer’s over, Kashmere High is expected to finally get a passing grade.That’s despite doubts by many, even its own students, that Kashmere could improve in time, as reading coach Shundra Mosley explained at a community meeting last fall. “She told me, she said, ‘Miss, why did you come here? We bad, miss. Kashmere’s bad. Why did you come here?’” Mosley said, recounting a conversation with a student.“And I had to hold the tears back and I had to swallow a little bit and let her know that Ms. Mosley has been known to turn bad into good but I can’t do that by myself. It takes all of us and what we’ve come here to do. I said all that to say, their confidence is low because of what they’re hearing,” Mosley said.For at least the last two years, Kashmere’s students and teachers have heard that if they don’t improve, their school could be shut down — or the state could take over the entire elected school board of the Houston Independent School District, thanks to a law known as House Bill 1842. At least for Kashmere’s part, that threat appears to be waning. But just like the school’s struggle has been years in the making, so has its turnaround. News 88.7 looked back at four key changes that have helped the school improve.More access to social services: In 2016, Kashmere High opened a new service center with the help of the group, ProUnitas. There students could find a food pantry, mental health services and other support. It’s since evolved to include more wrap-around social services for students at all the schools in the neighborhood. Helping bring in that support: alumni, churches and community leaders, like Keith Downey. “It’s not someone else’s responsibility, it’s all our responsibility,” Downey told News 88.7 last fall.Community Support: Downey helped create a community council four and a half years ago for schools in Kashmere Gardens. He said that there are ongoing social service needs in the community, especially after Harvey hit Kashmere Gardens hard. “A lot of our children are hungry and we want them to pass a test to see where a school lies. But if you’re hungry in the mornings, then can an adult pass the test if they’re hungry in the mornings?”The community council holds regular meetings with principals and social service coordinators to check how they are doing academically and what kind of support they need. Downey said the social services and community support have been critical for Kashmere students.Stable Leadership: Chris Ray graduated from Kashmere High School and now sends his daughter there. He said that within the last 10 years or so, he hasn’t seen a principal who’s lasted long enough to watch a freshmen class graduate as seniors — and that churn in leadership drags down improvement. And Ray noted that it takes time to develop improvement in education: “You take a year to figure out the problem. You take the second year to implement some things to help solve the problem,” Ray told News 88.7 earlier this year. “In the third year, those things that didn’t work, you go back and reinvest more problem solutions. And maybe the fourth year everything turns around.”Ray said that recent principals have brought stability and momentum. In 2015, Nancy Blackwell came out of retirement from the Aldine school district to lead Kashmere High. She made sure all teachers were certified and got others more training. But, as she told News 88.7  in 2017, they missed the state’s grade by just a few points: “Coming close hurts, but coming close doesn’t count,” Blackwell said. Then came Hurricane Harvey, prompting the state to give Kashmere a one-year break from its accountability system. Consistency: Halfway through this past school year, Kashmere’s new principal Reginald Bush gave his prediction: “Consistency, consistency is the big piece.” In his first year, Bush has brought a military-style energy to campus. He’s put tutors in classrooms and encouraged students to join clubs. Along the way, they’ve celebrated small victories in ways students wanted, like fish fries and field trips, turning that doubt into confidence. “I think if we remain consistent, with the momentum that we have, there’s no doubt in our mind that Kashmere will receive distinctions this year,” Bush said.Kashmere High will get its official state letter grade in August when the Texas Education Agency releases them. However, if the school barely passes, the pressure for progress will continue, because Texas will expect more improvement the following year. center_img X Share last_img read more

Laserbased camera can see around corners

first_img Tool to visualize bloodstains created by chemistry researchers This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. (PhysOrg.com) — Researchers from MIT have developed a camera that can capture images of a scene that is not in its direct line of sight. The camera is equipped with a femtosecond laser, which fires extremely short bursts of light that can reflect off one object (such as a door or mirror) and then a second object before reflecting back to the first object and being captured by the camera. Algorithms can then use this information to reconstruct the hidden scene. © 2010 PhysOrg.com More information: “Femtosecond Transient Imaging” by Ahmed Kirmani The laser-based camera system is being designed by MIT Professor Ramesh Raskar and others. They call the system a “femtosecond transient imaging system,” and explain that it exploits the fact that it is possible to capture light at extremely short time scales, about one quadrillionth of a second. By continuously gathering light and computing the time and distance that each pixel has traveled, the camera creates a “3D time-image” of the scene.”It’s like having x-ray vision without the x-rays,” Raskar said. “We’re going around the problem rather than going through it.”The researchers are still in the early stages of development and are working on accurately mapping more complex scenes. They predict that the system could have a variety of applications. For instance, it could be used for search and rescue missions to search for survivors in a collapsed building or a building on fire. It could also be used for avoiding car collisions at blind corners, for machine vision, and for inspecting industrial objects with hidden surfaces. It could have similar biomedical imaging applications by allowing doctors to use endoscopes to view areas inside the body that are normally hidden. The researchers noted that a portable imaging system in the form of an endoscope could be ready in the next two years. Explore further The left illustration shows how short light pulses are reflected off a door and scatter in different directions. Some of the light is reflected back to the camera, while some of it is reflected off a hidden object or person in the room. Some of this light is then reflected back to the door, where it can be captured by the camera and used to create an image of the hidden object or person. The right illustration shows the system being used for search and rescue in a burning building. Image credits: Ahmed Kirmani, MIT. Citation: Laser-based camera can see around corners (2010, November 17) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2010-11-laser-based-camera-corners.htmllast_img read more

August 14 2015Here is a group photo of the Cosant

first_imgAugust 14, 2015Here is a group photo of the Cosanti Foundation Strategic Plan Steering Committee taken on 6/21/2015 during their quarterly meeting at Arcosanti.upper row from left: Colleen Reckow; Neil Urban, Monique De Los Rios-Urban, Jim Caid, Jeff Stein, Anthony Floyd, Roger Tomalty, Jeff Zucker, Scott Riley, Ruth Rae, Tomiaki Tamura and Peter Scaglione.front row from left: Russel Ferguson, Steven Hall, Jim Anaston-Karas, Cosanti Foundation legal counsel Scott DeWald, George Kosmides and Mary Hoadley.last_img read more

Governor signs Rep Miller bill eliminating election loophole

first_img11Dec Governor signs Rep. Miller bill eliminating election loophole Categories: Miller News State representatives and senators who resign from office will not be allowed to run in the special election called to fill their seats after legislation introduced by state Rep. Aaron Miller was recently signed into law.Miller, who chairs the House Elections and Ethics Committee, said the legislation was drafted to close a loophole used by two former lawmakers during the 2015-16 legislative session.“The Legislature has the responsibility to oversee itself, and allowing a legislator who has resigned or been expelled to turn around and immediately run to fill vacant seat is just absurd,” said Miller, of Sturgis.Miller’s legislation clarifies that when an elected official resigns or is removed from legislative office, the resignation or removal remains in effect for the remainder of the term.“This is a simple bill,” Miller said. “It just clarifies that a resignation or expulsion remains in effect for the rest of the term. The next legislative session is a whole new ballgame, and the former legislator can run again at that time if they so choose.”House Bill 4208 is now Public Act 192 of 2017.###last_img read more

Online newspaper the Huffington Post has launched

first_imgOnline newspaper the Huffington Post has launched a new live-streaming channel, HuffPost Live.The Huffington Post has reportedly hired about 100 staff to work on the channel, which will air live for 12 hours a day, with content repeated overnight and at weekends. Content from the channel will also be made available on-demand. The venture is to be headed by Roy Sekoff, who presented the first live segment alongside Huffington Post founder Arianna Huffington.HuffPost Live operates from studios in New York and Los Angeles, with a satellite studio based at its Washington DC facility.last_img read more

Vincent Bolloré has been held in custody by French

first_imgVincent Bolloré has been held in custody by French police in relation to a corruption enquiry concerning container terminals operated by Bolloré Group in Togo and Guinea, according to press reports.Vincent BolloréAccording to Le Monde, Nanterre judicial police have taken the billionaire businessman and former Vivendi chairman into custody in relation to an enquiry into the alleged corruption of foreign public officials. The investigation concerns contracts awarded to Bolloré Group to operate container terminals in Lomé, Togo, and Conakry, Guinea, in 2010.According to the report, officials suspect that Bolloré Group managers used advertising subsidiary Havas – now owned by Vivendi – to help secure the election of officials by providing assistance at a discounted rate.Other executives have been also taken into custody, including Bolloré CEO Gilles Alix and Jean-Philippe Dorent, responsible for Havas’ international operations, according to Le Monde.Dorent was reportedly involved in the 2010 Guinean presidential campaign of Alpha Condé, a one-time exile in France and acquaintance of Vincent Bolloré. Condé is alleged to have been instrumental in helping Bolloré Group secure the Conakry contract.Bolloré’s winning of the contract led to legal action by French group Necotrans, which previously held the concession. Necotrans subsequently dropped the action after striking a deal to sell its Gabon operation to Bolloré.According to Challenges.fr, police have also held Francis Pérez, the head of Spanish firm Pefaco, which operates a number of hotels and casinos in Africa, and an acquaintance of Dorent.Bolloré Group issued a statement denying that its affiliate SDV Afrique had been involved in any irregularities and said that the questioning of its executives would substantiate this. It said that the issues raised had already been the subject of an independent audit that had concluded all operations had been regular.The group said that it was a long-term investor in Africa. It said that it had obtained the Togo concession in 2001, before it acquired a stake in Havas, and that its winning of the Guinea contract followed the failure of the group that initially placed the highest bid, which had occurred before the election of Condé.The news comes after Bolloré recently announced that he was stepping down as Vivendi chairman and handing the reins over to his son Yannick, chairman and CEO of Havas.last_img read more

Twitter has agreed a new multiyear deal to bring v

first_imgTwitter has agreed a new multiyear deal to bring videogame highlights and livestream content of the Overwatch League to the platform.OverwatchStarting in Overwatch League’s 2019 season, a weekly preview show covering upcoming Overwatch League matches, will be streamed live on Twitter via the Overwatch League’s account.Twitter will also host “near-real-time” highlight clips from every match of the Overwatch League regular season, playoffs, Grand Finals, and All-Star Weekend.“From the inception of the Overwatch League, the community on Twitter has always been one of our most passionate and engaged,” said Daniel Cherry, vice president and chief marketing officer for Activision Blizzard Esports Leagues.“That’s why we are particularly excited to announce this collaboration, beginning with the Overwatch League’s All-Star Weekend.”Twitter’s head of gaming partnerships, Rishi Chadha, said: “Twitter is where Overwatch League conversations happen and we’re thrilled to bring more content to the platform for several years.”The Overwatch League is a global professional eSports league with teams across Asia, Europe, and North America. Overwatch was created by games publisher Blizzard Entertainment, a division of Activision Blizzard.last_img read more