How body image concerns in young men contribute to increase in hospital

first_img Source:https://www.hud.ac.uk/ Reviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Dec 4 2018″Recent media reports highlighting NHS statistics which show a rapid increase in the number of boys and young men being admitted to hospital suffering from eating disorders are welcome, if only for helping to draw attention to this issue. Although girls and young women are still around seven times more likely to be treated for an eating disorder, prevalence rates are increasing much more rapidly in males.Some of this increase may be explained by boys and young men simply being more willing to seek help. Although the stigma surrounding mental illness is decreasing for both sexes, historically men have been much less willing to admit to having psychological problems. Stereotypes surrounding masculinity have contributed to a culture where young men often feel compelled to conceal their distress, and this is reflected in the fact that suicide is much more common, and actually the primary cause of mortality in this group. If young men are increasingly feeling more able to seek help, then this can only be welcomed.However, the wider concern is what is causing the increase in eating disorders in young people, and especially young men? For many sufferers, poor and distorted body image is clearly implicated, and researchers and clinicians have started to focus on the potential negative influences of social media in this regard. Although the evidence is far from conclusive, it seems likely that, at least for some vulnerable individuals, social media may contribute to their body image concerns and associated eating disorders. A culture of social media use which encourages young people to constantly post updates and images of themselves, which are often then judged by their peers, puts them under extreme pressure to focus on their appearance, and equates this with social acceptance and worth. At the same time, young people are bombarded with images which depict often unrealistic or unattainable standards of attractiveness.This social comparison aspect of social media is reflected in sex differences in the body image concerns of young men versus young women. In contrast to a typical female drive for thinness, young men are often driven towards achieving greater and more defined muscularity (a phenomenon which has been labeled “bigorexia”). Although it might seem that spending a bit more time in the gym might not be too much of a problem, for some, this can become a pathological obsession, and, especially where it is associated with related issues such as steroid abuse and extreme fasting, this can have dangerous consequences.Related StoriesIt is okay for women with lupus to get pregnant with proper care, says new studyRaw meat can act as reservoir for bacteria associated with hospital infectionsHome-based support network helps stroke patients adjust after hospital dischargeClearly, social media play a central role in the lives of many young people, and efforts by parents and teachers to ban or drastically cut down on their use are likely to be futile or even counter-productive, given their benefits in terms of allowing individuals who might otherwise be socially isolated to connect with each other. Instead, educating young people about the reality and potential hazards of social media may help to address some of these negative effects. Studies have shown that educating young women about the techniques used to manipulate images of “size-zero” models in mainstream media advertisements decreases the negative effects of these on their body image. Similarly, educating young people about the artificial and manipulated nature of social media, and the pitfalls of unquestioningly comparing themselves to others in their social networks, could help to protect young people from their potentially negative effects.Psychologists also know that eating disorders are often fundamentally about control. Young people who have experienced abuse, bullying, trauma or social isolation, or who simply feel powerless to live up to the standards set by others, may feel that the only thing they can take control over is their body. Developing a culture in which we encourage and support young people to accept rather than judge themselves and each other, instead of pressurizing them to constantly strive for perfection, will help them to become more balanced and healthy individuals, and address this rising tide of eating disorders.”last_img read more

Short bouts of stairclimbing throughout the day can improve cardiovascular health

first_img Source:https://www.mcmaster.ca/ Reviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Jan 18 2019It just got harder to avoid exercise. A few minutes of stair climbing, at short intervals throughout the day, can improve cardiovascular health, according to new research from kinesiologists at McMaster University and UBC Okanagan.The findings, published in the journal Applied Physiology, Nutrition and Metabolism, suggest that virtually anyone can improve their fitness, anywhere, any time.”The findings make it even easier for people to incorporate ‘exercise snacks’ into their day,” says Martin Gibala, a professor of kinesiology at McMaster and senior author on the study.”Those who work in office towers or live in apartment buildings can vigorously climb a few flights of stairs in the morning, at lunch, and in the evening and know they are getting an effective workout.”Related StoriesOlympus Europe and Cytosurge join hands to accelerate drug development, single cell researchResearch sheds light on sun-induced DNA damage and repairDiet and physical exercise do not reduce risk of gestational diabetesPrevious studies had shown that brief bouts of vigorous exercise, or sprint interval training (SIT), are effective when performed as a single session, with a few minutes of recovery between the intense bursts, requiring a total time commitment of 10 minutes or so.For this study, researchers set out to determine if SIT exercise snacks, or vigorous bouts of stairclimbing performed as single sprints spread throughout the day would be sufficient enough to improve cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF), an important healthy marker that is linked to longevity and cardiovascular disease risk.One group of sedentary young adults vigorously climbed a three-flight stairwell, three times per day, separated by one to four hours of recovery. They repeated the protocol three times each week over the course of six weeks. The researchers compared the change in their fitness to a control group which did not exercise.”We know that sprint interval training works, but we were a bit surprised to see that the stair snacking approach was also effective,” says Jonathan Little, assistant professor at UBC’s Okanagan campus and study co-author. “Vigorously climbing a few flights of stairs on your coffee or bathroom break during the day seems to be enough to boost fitness in people who are otherwise sedentary.”In addition to being more fit, the stair climbers were also stronger compared to their sedentary counterparts at the end of the study, and generated more power during a maximal cycling test.In future, researchers hope to investigate different exercise snacking protocols with varying recovery times, and the effect on other health-related indicators such as blood pressure and glycemic control.last_img read more

High prevalence of multiresistant intestinal bacteria in Vietnamese hospitals

first_imgRelated StoriesNew methods to recognize antimicrobial resistant bacteria and how they workNon-pathogenic bacteria engineered as Trojan Horse to treat tumors from withinRaw meat can act as reservoir for bacteria associated with hospital infectionsThe researchers conclude that there is an epidemic spread of multiresistant intestinal bacteria in Vietnamese hospitals with rapid transmission to hospitalized patients.”The extensive spread of carbapenem-resistant intestinal bacteria means that forceful measures must be taken to reduce the transmission of infection in hospitals, by improvements to hand hygiene, the use of sterile working methods during surgery and when handling venous catheters, and by isolating patients who have been affected by multiresistant intestinal bacteria. It is also important to have effective follow up when patients are discharged from hospital, in order to reduce the spread of these bacteria in the population. But even if we do everything right, it will take a long time to get infections down to an acceptably low level”, says Håkan Hanberger.In the case of Sweden, the presence of carbapenem-resistant bacteria so far is extremely low.”Sweden is one of the countries in the world where the situation with respect to carbapenem-resistant intestinal bacteria is most favorable. It is one of the countries that can probably delay the spread the longest, but we must improve hygiene in the healthcare services also in Sweden”, says Håkan Hanberger.The study has received support from, among other bodies, Karolinska Institutet, Linköping University, Region östergötland, the Swedish Foundation for International Cooperation in Research and Higher Education (STINT), ReAct – Action on Antibiotic Resistance, and the participating hospitals. Source:Linköping UniversityJournal reference:Tran, D M. et al. (2019) High prevalence of colonisation with carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae among patients admitted to Vietnamese hospitals: Risk factors and burden of disease. Journal of Infection. doi.org/10.1016/j.jinf.2019.05.013 The sub-study looked at the most vulnerable patients, new-born children who needed intensive care, and showed that mortality was five times higher in those who had a hospital-acquired infection and were carriers of the multiresistant CRE bacteria.”Håkan Hanberger, Professor, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jun 26 2019Around half of patients admitted to hospital in Vietnam are carriers of multiresistant intestinal bacteria, which are resistant to carbapenems, a group of broad-spectrum antibiotics. This is the conclusion of a study by Swedish and Vietnamese scientists led by Linköping University, published in the Journal of Infection.”In our study, we see a high prevalence of multiresistant intestinal bacteria in Vietnamese hospitals. The longer the patients are in hospital, the greater is the risk that they have been infected by intestinal bacteria resistant to carbapenems”, says Håkan Hanberger, professor in the Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine at Linköping University and consultant in the Infection Clinic at Linköping University Hospital.There are several reasons why carbapenem-resistant enterobacteriaceae (CRE) are a serious problem. They are resistant to nearly all broad-spectrum antibiotics, which means that infections caused by these bacteria are difficult to treat. In addition, CRE can pass antibiotic-resistance genes to other bacteria, causing these to become resistant to the carbapenem group of antibiotics. Intestinal bacteria spread easily, such as on hands and furniture used in the care of infants. They cause various types of infection, primarily urinary tract infections, sepsis and pneumonia. These multiresistant intestinal bacteria are spreading rapidly around the world, and WHO has given the highest priority to measures to control the spread of CRE and to develop new antibiotics against these bacteria.The study reported in the Journal of Infection included more than 2,200 patients admitted to 63 different wards at 12 hospitals in various parts of Vietnam. Rectal swabs were taken from the patients and investigated for the presence of CRE. Being a carrier is a risk factor for contracting a clinical infection with the bacteria, but not all carriers become sick.Risk factors for becoming a carrier of multiresistant intestinal bacteria were a longer stay in the hospital and contracting an infection during the stay, known as a “hospital-acquired infection”. One of eight patients (13%) were carriers at admission, which had increased to seven of eight patients (87%) after two weeks in hospital. Another risk factor for patients in the study was being treated with carbapenem, which contributes to the carbapenem-resistant bacteria being selected.In a sub-study of 328 new-born children in a neonatal intensive care unit, the scientists showed that mortality is linked to being a carrier for CRE and to having a hospital-acquired infection when admitted to the unit (odds ratio 5.5, p<0.01).last_img read more

Pedal power the rise of cargo bikes in Germany

Florists, chimneysweepsBut the “workhorse of the 21st century”, as the Frankfurter Rundschau newspaper dubbed it, has yet to win over the masses.Just one percent of Germans own a cargo bike, a study released by the transport ministry in March found—although seven percent said they considered buying one.Becker believes this will change “in the next few years”. “First people need to be able to try it out” without spending 1,300 to 5,000 euros ($1,500-$6000) depending on the model, she said.Keen to promote the climate-friendly cargo bikes, several initiatives have emerged to lend them to companies and individuals for free trials. Last year, German firm Velogut began loaning them out to 150 companies in Berlin.Among the sign-ups have been photographers, coffee and pastry vendors, florists, chimneysweeps, beekeepers, Christmas tree deliverers and even a travelling anaesthetist.The federal government has also got in on the act by introducing a rebate of up to 2,500 euros for the purchase of an e-cargo bike with a load of more than 150 kilos, while Berlin authorities offer subsidies of 500 to 1,000 euros. Explore further Today Germany is Europe’s largest market for cargo bikes in terms of volume—with industry data showing sales for electrically assisted cargo bikes alone surged to 21,000 in 2017, 42 percent over the previous year ‘Protect us’But experts say the biggest roadblock to cargo bikes going mainstream is the lack of adapted infrastructure: safe cycle lanes, secure parking and easy-to-find repair shops.”If they want clean air, they have to protect us,” said Antje Merschel, co-initiator of a recent Berlin referendum on cycling policies.”We’re not going to risk our lives on a bike.”Online retailer Amazon has started using cargo bikes for deliveries, while shipping giant UPS has been running battery-powered freight bikes in German cities since 2012.But the big players in delivery are still waiting for bike manufacturers to catch up and mass-produce reliable low-maintainance models, which are so far mostly made by small, independent companies.There is also the complication of needing “micro-hubs” in often high-rent urban areas from where couriers can collect trucked-in goods for the final kilometres to the client’s front door.”For families, the bikes are here and they’re reliable,” said urban planner Francisco Luciano of the French cargo bike manufacturer Douze Cycles. “When it comes to cycle logistics, we’re still learning.” Bike-share companies are transforming US cities – and they’re just getting started Today Germany is Europe’s largest market for cargo bikes in terms of volume—with industry data showing sales for electrically assisted cargo bikes alone surged to 21,000 in 2017, 42 percent over the previous year.No sweatOver the years, cargo bikes have evolved from bulky two-wheelers that required serious leg muscle. Modern upgrades offer lighter frames and more spacious carriers, while e-cargo bikes have allowed the less physically active or those living in hilly areas to also jump in the saddle.Cargo bikes “now reach a wider audience, people who don’t want to arrive at work sweaty or aren’t especially sporty,” said Sophia Becker, a researcher at the Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies (IASS) in Potsdam near Berlin.According to the European CycleLogistics project, a staggering 174 models of cargo bikes are now available, while some 50 brands vied for attention at Berlin’s International Cargo Bike Festival in April. Citation: Pedal power: the rise of cargo bikes in Germany (2018, May 2) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-05-power-cargo-bikes-germany.html © 2018 AFP A desire to go green has been key to the rise of cargo bikes in a country where dozens of smog-choked cities are considering diesel driving bans to combat air pollution.”The diesel scandal is a major incentive,” said Arne Behrensen, one of the top promotors of cargo bikes in Germany, a mode of transport as old as the bicycle itself which refers to a two- or three-wheeled bike with a fixed load carrier, usually at the front.Financial incentives, more choice in models and the promise of zipping past rush-hour traffic in the bike lane have added to the appeal.”In the ’90s, we were happy to sell one a year,” said Gaya Schuetze of Berlin’s Mehringhof bicycle shop, one of the capital’s leading cargo bike centres.”Then we noticed more and more interest, first from families and then companies.”Commonplace in northern Europe until the mid-20th century, freight bikes were used to deliver everyday essentials such as milk, bread and newspapers.But these heavy, unwieldy bikes quickly fell out of favour and into oblivion as motorised vehicles gained ground.The cargo bike’s revival began some two decades ago in cycling-mad Denmark and the Netherlands, blessed with flat landscapes and comfortable bike lanes, before reaching Germany. Modern cargo bikes offer lighter frames and more spacious carriers, while electrically assisted ones allow the less physically active or those living in hilly areas to also jump in the saddle Whether they’re hauling parcels or children, cargo bikes are becoming a familiar sight in German cities as the nippy, clean alternative to cars and delivery vans—and shaking up urban transport in the process. Industry observers say the cargo bike craze has yet to run its course because “they can handle situations where a car previously seemed indispensable”, says Becker.”In an average European city, half of all motorised trips related to goods transport could be shifted to bicycle or cargo bikes,” Karl Reiter of the CycleLogistics project calculated in a 2014 study, based on journeys of a maximum of seven kilometres (4.3 miles) with loads of less than 200 kilos (440 pounds). Experts say the biggest roadblock to cargo bikes going mainstream is the lack of adapted infrastructure: safe cycle lanes, secure parking and easy-to-find repair shops The cargo bike craze has yet to run its course because “they can handle situations where a car previously seemed indispensable,” says green researcher Sophia Becker This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. read more

Amazon Prime Day Best Deals for Science Lovers

first_imgAmazon’s annual Prime Day will deliver savings on thousands of products for Prime members today (July 16). Live Science is wading through these products so you don’t have to, bringing you the nerdiest picks: from microscope slide collections to DIY robots; from chemistry sets to molecule jewelry. For all you science geeks out there, here’s a look at what we’re watching right now. We will be updating this page throughout the day with our favorite science-y deals. Dinosaur PuppetsHeadbutting Tiny Worms Are Really, Really LoudThis rapid strike produces a loud ‘pop’ comparable to those made by snapping shrimps, one of the most intense biological sounds measured at sea.Your Recommended PlaylistVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9接下来播放Why Is It ‘Snowing’ Salt in the Dead Sea?01:53 facebook twitter 发邮件 reddit 链接https://www.livescience.com/59741-amazon-prime-day-science-deals.html?jwsource=cl已复制直播00:0000:3500:35  Rawr! Stage epic Jurassic battles with three colorful dinosaur head puppets. Though real dinosaurs were feathered, these heads of extinct carnivorous dinosaurs such at T. rex and Velociraptor are made of soft, painted silicon. Prime Day price: $18.95, a savings of 20% for Prime members Buy Dinosaur Puppets on Amazon.com Anatomy Apron Instead of wearing your heart on your sleeve, why not wear it on an apron — along with your lungs, liver, intestines and other organs? Soft sculptures in polyester and cotton offer an external view of the organs in the human body, assembled in their correct positions. Prime Day price: $17.99, a savings of 40% for Prime members Buy Anatomy Apron on Amazon.com Newton’s Cradle Enjoy a mesmerizing desktop display of physics in action, with a device known as Newton’s Cradle. The swinging motion of the stainless steel balls demonstrates conservation of momentum and energy as the balls at the end of the row transmit force through the rest of the spheres. Prime Day price: $12.79, a savings of 20% for Prime members Buy Newton’s Cradle on Amazon.com Shark Night Light Sharks usually cruise unseen in the dark ocean depths, but this 3D illuminated shark lamp will light up the darkness of your room. The LED light cycles through seven colors and is powered by USB or 3 AA batteries (not included). Prime Day price: $13.19, a savings of 20% for Prime members Buy 3D Shark Night Light on Amazon.com Prepared Human Pathology Slide Set These 12 research-quality slides are a superb educational tool for introducing students to the effects of disease on the human body. They contain tissue samples representing a range of human pathologies, including anaemia, tuberculosis, cancer, fibroma and tumors. Prime Day price: $40.00, a savings of 20% for Prime members Buy Human Pathology Slide Set on Amazon.com Inflatable Stegosaurus Costume This inflatable costume will transform you into the stegosaurus you’ve always wanted to be. The costume is 100% polyester and is best suited for people of heights between 4 feet 9 inches (1.5 meters) and six feet two inches (1.9 m) tall. Included with the costume is fan for inflation, which requires 4 AA batteries (not included). Prime Day price: $35.19, a savings of 20% for Prime members Buy Dinosaur Costume on Amazon.com Over-Glasses Safety Goggles Just because you wear prescriptions glasses doesn’t mean you have to compromise safety during your experiments. These durable, scratch-resistant safety goggles will fit comfortably over your glasses, offering protection against splattering liquids or airborne particles. They also filter out 99% of UV light. Prime Day price: $8.52, a savings of 20% for Prime members Buy Safety Goggles on Amazon.com National Geographic Birds Field Guide Get to know your feathered neighbors with the “National Geographic Field Guide to the Birds of North America,” the most up-to-date guide available. Beautifully illustrated and packed with information to thrill and delight birdwatchers of all levels, the book describes more than 1,000 species of birds. Prime Day price: $16.32, a savings of 46% for Prime members. Take an additional $5 off the price with promo code PRIMEBOOK19 when spending $15 or more on books offered by Amazon.com. Buy Nat Geo Bird Guide on Amazon.com Caffeine Necklace Show the world how much you love coffee on a molecular level, with this metal alloy necklace that shows coffee’s chemical structure. Also available in silver, gold and rose gold tones. Prime Day price: $11.85, a savings of 25% for Prime members Buy Caffeine Necklace on Amazon.com Nicola Tesla Patents Art Prints Celebrate the genius of pioneering engineer and thinker Nicola Tesla with a set of six art prints depicting some of his most celebrated inventions, including an electromagnet motor, an electric incandescent lamp and an alternative electric current generator. Prime Day price: $11.24, a savings of 25% for Prime members Buy Tesla Patents Prints on Amazon.com Hummingbird Feeder If hummingbirds are native to the region where you live, you can attract them to your backyard with this easy-to-assemble hummingbird feeder. It can hold 12 ounces (0.4 liters) of nectar and has four feeding stations, and it can be suspended from a pole, pillar or branch. Prime Day price: $10.87, a savings of 36% for Prime members Buy Hummingbird Feeder on Amazon.com Math Formula Wall Clock Math nerds will delight in keeping time with this silent, battery-operated wall clock, which displays math equations to mark the hours. It measures 12 inches (31 centimeters) in diameter and requires one AA battery (not included). Prime Day price: $19.74, a savings of 21% for Prime members Buy Math Formula Wall Clock on Amazon.com Moon Lamp Now you can experience the full moon whenever you like, with a spherical lamp modeled to resemble the lunar surface. The lamp features 16 colors and 4 display modes, which can be adjusted by touch or by remote control, and it will remain illuminated for 6 to 12 hours at a time, depending on the brightness setting. Prime Day price: $18.49, a savings of 26% for Prime members Buy Moon Lamp on Amazon.com Microscope Slide Collection A diverse array of microscopic tissue samples representing plants and animals are at your fingertips, in this 48-pack microscope slide collection. These high-transparency prepared plastic slides are clearly labeled and will provide hours of fascination and discovery for curious minds with a microscope. Prime Day price: $9.80, a 51% savings for Prime members Buy Microscope Slides on Amazon.com Serotonin Molecule Sterling Silver Necklace Serotonin is a neurotransmitter associated with the regulation of mood, sleep patterns and appetite, and is thought to contribute to feelings of happiness. With this serotonin molecule necklace, you can carry a little happiness with you wherever you go. Prime Day price: $18.39, a savings of 20% for Prime members Buy Serotonin Necklace on Amazon.com Boom! Combustion Chemistry Kit Who could resist the chance to make something go boom? This kit includes everything an aspiring chemist will need to make colorful expanding liquids; to launch rockets and geysers; and to generate explosive sounds and sparkle effects. Recommended for ages 8 (with adult supervision) and up. Prime Day price: $36.58, Prime members save an additional 20% at checkout Buy Boom! Chemistry Kit on Amazon.com Men’s Science Socks Put your best foot forward (and by “best” we mean “nerdiest”) with these colorful socks, decorated with atoms, beakers, microscopes, and other science symbols. Prime Day price: $8.79, a savings of 20% for Prime members Buy Men’s Science Socks on Amazon.com Assorted Science Decals Declare your nerdiness to the world by plastering these science decals on everything you own. Each pack contains 50 unique designs that are fade-resistant and waterproof, each measuring around 2 to 3 inches (6 to 8 centimeters) wide. Prime Day price: $5.59, a savings of 20% for Prime members Buy Assorted Science Decals on Amazon.com Originally published on Live Science.by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeDugiFeedThis Is What Will Happen When You Eat Bananas Every DayDugiFeedUndoBrilliant Future10 Worst Paying College MajorsBrilliant FutureUndoMy Daily DiscoveryHow To Keep Your Photos And Videos SafeMy Daily DiscoveryUndoThe SideHairstyles That Make You Look Younger Than EverThe SideUndoeasyrecipes20 Toughest Restaurants Worldwide To Get A Reservation (But Worth The Wait)easyrecipesUndoYour Health7 Natural Pain Relief TechniquesYour HealthUndolast_img read more

The two who stole the show at the swearingin ceremonyThe two who

first_imgA view of the illuminated Rashtrapati Bhavan during the swearing-in ceremony on Thursday   –  RV Moorthy BJP national politics SHARE Published on A little-known Odisha MP shares spotlight with Modi May 30, 2019center_img national elections Two persons stole the show during the nearly two-hour-long swearing-in ceremony. The first of them may have been easy to guess: Narendra Damodardas Modi. But the second one was quite a surprise. When Pratap Chandra Sarangi, first-time Member of Parliament from Balasore, Odisha, was called upon to take his oath as Minister of State, a section of the 5,000-plus crowd was on its feet, clapping. Sarangi had been called 56th (out of 58) on the list, at the fag end, but the invocation of his name set off a frisson of energy. Sarangi contested the election with very limited resources. He used a bicycle and public transport to campaign. Sarangi was a surprise inclusion in the Ministry. Another surprise induction was that of S Jaishankar, the former Foreign Secretary. He had been given a seat in the first row. There are six women in the Ministry, accounting for 10 per cent of the total. Three of them have Cabinet rank; the three others are Ministers of State. The Ministry has four bureaucrats and one Army General. And going against expectations, it has only a small representation from West Bengal and Odisha, where the BJP performed better than expected. Four allies became part of the Council, but one partner, the JD (U), did not join; it is believed to have sought more than one ministerial post, whereas the BJP was willing to include one Minister each from all its allies.The President interrupted five of the Ministers who stumbled over their oaths. One Minister, G Kishan Reddy, ended with a ‘Bharat Mata ki Jai’ slogan. Anil Kapoor, Anupam Kher, and other film stars were present; but it was Mary Kom and Gautam Gambhir who got the most number of requests for selfies. Strikingly, cell phones were allowed to be carried to the venue. SHARE SHARE EMAIL COMMENT COMMENTSlast_img read more

Pakistan will not open airspace until India withdraws fighter jets from IAF

first_imgPakistan will not open airspace until India withdraws fighter jets from IAF forward airbasesPakistan had completely shut its airspace for Indian flights after the Balakot airstrikes on February 26 in the aftermath of the Pulwama terror attack.advertisement Press Trust of India IslamabadJuly 12, 2019UPDATED: July 12, 2019 19:03 IST Pakistan PM Imran Khan. (Image: Twitter)HIGHLIGHTSPakistan has said it will not open its airspace for Indian commercial flightsThe airspace was shut after Balakot airstrikes on Feb 26Pakistan has said until India removes its fighter jets from IAF forward airbases, it would remain shutPakistan has told India that it will not open its airspace for commercial flights until New Delhi removes its fighter jets from forward IAF airbases, Pakistan’s Aviation Secretary Shahrukh Nusrat has informed a Parliamentary committee.Pakistan fully closed its airspace on February 26 after the Indian Air Force (IAF) fighter jets struck a Jaish-e-Mohammed (JeM) terrorist training camp in Balakot following the Pulwama terror attack in Kashmir.Aviation Secretary Nusrat, who is also the Director General of the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA), on Thursday informed the Senate Standing Committee on Aviation that his department has intimated Indian officials that Pakistani airspace would remain unavailable for use by India until the country withdraws its fighter jets from forward positions, Dawn News reported.”The Indian government approached asking us to open the airspace. We conveyed our concerns that first India must withdraw its fighter planes placed forward,” Nusrat told the committee.This is probably the first time a senior Pakistani official has publicly stated Islamabad’s precondition for reopening its airspace after the Balakot air strikes.He further apprised the committee that Indian officials have contacted Pakistan requesting it to lift the airspace restrictions.”However, Indian officials have been told that Indian airbases are still laden with fighter jets and Pakistan will not allow resumption of flight operations from India until their removal,” said Nusrat.Last month, the CAA had extended the airspace ban till July 12. It had earlier extended the airspace restriction until June 30.After the restrictions, all the passenger flights are being diverted to alternative routes by India, The Express Tribune reported.The CAA official also contested India’s claim that Delhi had opened its airspace for Pakistan, the report said.”Pakistani flights from Thailand have not been restored since the closure of the Indian airspace. Pakistan International Airlines (PIA) flights for Malaysia also remain suspended,” the CAA DG informed the committee.Last month, Pakistan gave special permission to Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s VVIP flight to use its airspace for his official trip to attend the Shanghai Cooperation Organisation Summit in Bishkek, the capital of Kyrgyzstan.However Prime Minister Modi’s VVIP aircraft avoided flying over Pakistan. Earlier, Pakistan had allowed India’s former External Affairs Minister Sushma Swaraj to fly directly though Pakistani airspace to participate in the meeting of SCO foreign ministers in Bishkek on May 21.India aviation industry has suffered huge losses due to the airspace ban by Pakistan.On Thursday, Civil Aviation Minister Hardeep Singh Puri told Parliament that due to the closure of Pakistan airspace, Air India had to spend an extra Rs 430 crore on longer routes.Also Read | Air India suffers over 400 crore loss due to Pakistan airspace closureAlso Watch | No pleasantries exchanged between PM Modi, Imran Khan at SCO summit | WatchFor the latest World Cup news, live scores and fixtures for World Cup 2019, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for World Cup news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Posted bySanchari Chatterjee Nextlast_img read more