Short bouts of stairclimbing throughout the day can improve cardiovascular health

first_img Source:https://www.mcmaster.ca/ Reviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Jan 18 2019It just got harder to avoid exercise. A few minutes of stair climbing, at short intervals throughout the day, can improve cardiovascular health, according to new research from kinesiologists at McMaster University and UBC Okanagan.The findings, published in the journal Applied Physiology, Nutrition and Metabolism, suggest that virtually anyone can improve their fitness, anywhere, any time.”The findings make it even easier for people to incorporate ‘exercise snacks’ into their day,” says Martin Gibala, a professor of kinesiology at McMaster and senior author on the study.”Those who work in office towers or live in apartment buildings can vigorously climb a few flights of stairs in the morning, at lunch, and in the evening and know they are getting an effective workout.”Related StoriesOlympus Europe and Cytosurge join hands to accelerate drug development, single cell researchResearch sheds light on sun-induced DNA damage and repairDiet and physical exercise do not reduce risk of gestational diabetesPrevious studies had shown that brief bouts of vigorous exercise, or sprint interval training (SIT), are effective when performed as a single session, with a few minutes of recovery between the intense bursts, requiring a total time commitment of 10 minutes or so.For this study, researchers set out to determine if SIT exercise snacks, or vigorous bouts of stairclimbing performed as single sprints spread throughout the day would be sufficient enough to improve cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF), an important healthy marker that is linked to longevity and cardiovascular disease risk.One group of sedentary young adults vigorously climbed a three-flight stairwell, three times per day, separated by one to four hours of recovery. They repeated the protocol three times each week over the course of six weeks. The researchers compared the change in their fitness to a control group which did not exercise.”We know that sprint interval training works, but we were a bit surprised to see that the stair snacking approach was also effective,” says Jonathan Little, assistant professor at UBC’s Okanagan campus and study co-author. “Vigorously climbing a few flights of stairs on your coffee or bathroom break during the day seems to be enough to boost fitness in people who are otherwise sedentary.”In addition to being more fit, the stair climbers were also stronger compared to their sedentary counterparts at the end of the study, and generated more power during a maximal cycling test.In future, researchers hope to investigate different exercise snacking protocols with varying recovery times, and the effect on other health-related indicators such as blood pressure and glycemic control.last_img read more

Consolidation of core voters not Muslim vote to benefit Mahagathbandhan in western

first_imgSHARE SHARE EMAIL April 24, 2019 COMMENTS If the BJP’s sweep in 2014, in the three neighbouring constituencies of Moradabad, Sambhal and Rampur, where 48-52 per cent of the electorate is Muslim did not point to the phenomenon of fragmentation in the minority vote, the massive popular response to a young poet who debuted in the ongoing Lok Sabha elections on a Congress ticket from Moradabad confirms that the “Muslim vote monolith” is a bit of a myth.Imran Pratapgarhi, the Congress’ fresh-faced candidate from Moradabad, is a popular poet. An outsider to this massive constituency with about 19 lakh voters, Pratapgarhi’s campaign was mainly run by friends and a handful of idealists from Jawaharlal Nehru University (JNU), who believe in the triumph of the proletariat (working class) in the Hindi heartland.And yet, Pratapgarhi’s fresh appeal has convinced many people, especially in Moradabad town, that the youngster should get a chance. A conversation started on the need for young idealists in Parliament. The SP, which holds two of the five Assembly constituencies that constitute the Moradabad Lok Sabha seat, scurried around and unleashed all the local stalwarts to stop the “division of votes”.“Just because people come to hear a poet, it does not mean they would vote for him. This time, the Gathbandhan (an alliance of the SP, the BSP and the RLD) would sweep the seat,” said SP MLA from Moradabad(Rural) Haji Iqram Qureshi. Anxiety among supportersOthers supporting the alliance were anxious till the last minute. “Muslims are divided among caste lines and different choices. That is why the BJP won from here last time. What is different this time is that the Gathbandhan’s core voters — the Jatavs, the Yadavs and the Jats — will vote on one side and the SP can be somewhat certain of victory,” said Nadeem Khan, a handicraft exporter in Moradabad.In Rampur, with over 52 per cent Muslim voters, the BJP’s Nepal Singh trounced his nearest rival Naseer Ahmad Khan of the Samajwadi Party by 23,435 votes in 2014. This time, the BJP has fielded former MP and actor Jaya Prada from the constituency. She is confident of winning not just because a lot of people are upset with the SP strongman Azam Khan but because she believes that the Muslim vote “is not one block”. There were others who agreed with Jaya Prada but believed that the Gathbandhan arithmetic still tilted the scales in Azam Khan’s favour.“Azam Khan is a Pathan, who has managed to annoy the Turks. Their vote is about 1.5 lakh and they are not going to support him. Then there are the Shias, who traditionally support the Congress because it has always fielded members of the family of Nawab of Rampur who is a Shia. They may still vote for the Congress even though it has fielded a Khatri, former MLA Sanjay Kapoor. Still, just because Azam Khan is standing in elections and there is 52 per cent Muslim vote, you cannot say he would win. He is helped by the core vote of Mayawati, Mulayam Singh Yadav and Ajit Singh,” said Tamkeen Faiyyaz, a journalist in Rampur. Uttar Pradesh national electionscenter_img COMMENT Lok Sabha Published on SHARElast_img read more

Pakistan will not open airspace until India withdraws fighter jets from IAF

first_imgPakistan will not open airspace until India withdraws fighter jets from IAF forward airbasesPakistan had completely shut its airspace for Indian flights after the Balakot airstrikes on February 26 in the aftermath of the Pulwama terror attack.advertisement Press Trust of India IslamabadJuly 12, 2019UPDATED: July 12, 2019 19:03 IST Pakistan PM Imran Khan. (Image: Twitter)HIGHLIGHTSPakistan has said it will not open its airspace for Indian commercial flightsThe airspace was shut after Balakot airstrikes on Feb 26Pakistan has said until India removes its fighter jets from IAF forward airbases, it would remain shutPakistan has told India that it will not open its airspace for commercial flights until New Delhi removes its fighter jets from forward IAF airbases, Pakistan’s Aviation Secretary Shahrukh Nusrat has informed a Parliamentary committee.Pakistan fully closed its airspace on February 26 after the Indian Air Force (IAF) fighter jets struck a Jaish-e-Mohammed (JeM) terrorist training camp in Balakot following the Pulwama terror attack in Kashmir.Aviation Secretary Nusrat, who is also the Director General of the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA), on Thursday informed the Senate Standing Committee on Aviation that his department has intimated Indian officials that Pakistani airspace would remain unavailable for use by India until the country withdraws its fighter jets from forward positions, Dawn News reported.”The Indian government approached asking us to open the airspace. We conveyed our concerns that first India must withdraw its fighter planes placed forward,” Nusrat told the committee.This is probably the first time a senior Pakistani official has publicly stated Islamabad’s precondition for reopening its airspace after the Balakot air strikes.He further apprised the committee that Indian officials have contacted Pakistan requesting it to lift the airspace restrictions.”However, Indian officials have been told that Indian airbases are still laden with fighter jets and Pakistan will not allow resumption of flight operations from India until their removal,” said Nusrat.Last month, the CAA had extended the airspace ban till July 12. It had earlier extended the airspace restriction until June 30.After the restrictions, all the passenger flights are being diverted to alternative routes by India, The Express Tribune reported.The CAA official also contested India’s claim that Delhi had opened its airspace for Pakistan, the report said.”Pakistani flights from Thailand have not been restored since the closure of the Indian airspace. Pakistan International Airlines (PIA) flights for Malaysia also remain suspended,” the CAA DG informed the committee.Last month, Pakistan gave special permission to Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s VVIP flight to use its airspace for his official trip to attend the Shanghai Cooperation Organisation Summit in Bishkek, the capital of Kyrgyzstan.However Prime Minister Modi’s VVIP aircraft avoided flying over Pakistan. Earlier, Pakistan had allowed India’s former External Affairs Minister Sushma Swaraj to fly directly though Pakistani airspace to participate in the meeting of SCO foreign ministers in Bishkek on May 21.India aviation industry has suffered huge losses due to the airspace ban by Pakistan.On Thursday, Civil Aviation Minister Hardeep Singh Puri told Parliament that due to the closure of Pakistan airspace, Air India had to spend an extra Rs 430 crore on longer routes.Also Read | Air India suffers over 400 crore loss due to Pakistan airspace closureAlso Watch | No pleasantries exchanged between PM Modi, Imran Khan at SCO summit | WatchFor the latest World Cup news, live scores and fixtures for World Cup 2019, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for World Cup news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Posted bySanchari Chatterjee Nextlast_img read more