Noise pollution in hospital impact quality and safety of healthcare

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Nov 19 2018In an editorial published today in the BMJ, researchers from King’s College London and the University of the Arts London (UAL) argue that it is a worsening problem, with levels regularly exceeding international recommendations.”Even in intensive care units, which cater for the most vulnerable patients, noise levels over 100dB have been measured, the equivalent of loud music through headphones,” said lead author Dr Andreas Xyrichis.Noise in hospitals is known to hinder communication among staff, causing annoyance, irritation and fatigue, and detrimentally impact the quality and safety of healthcare. High noise levels and noise-induced stress impact negatively on staff performance and wellbeing, compromising caring behavior and contributing to burnout.The team highlight that it can also impact a patients’ ability to rest, heal and recover, since it has been linked to the development of ICU psychosis, hospitalization-induced stress, increased pain sensitivity, high blood pressure and poor mental health.”We know hospital noise has disruptive consequences for sleep – machine sounds in particular have a greater negative effect on arousal than human voices. Post-hospitalization recovery is also compromised. For example, coronary care patients treated during noisy periods were found to have a higher incidence of rehospitalization compared to those treated during quieter periods,” explained Andreas.Patients report that hospital noise can have a cumulative effect on their hospital experience. Patients who are in hospital for several nights are left feeling trapped and stressed, leading to requests for premature discharge from hospital and heightened risk of trauma and readmission.The team from King’s and UAL believes that the following areas urgently need to be addressed to ensure significant progress in this slow-moving field: Source:https://www.kcl.ac.uk/ Noise is often incorrectly associated with high sound pressure levels (SPLs). Dripping taps for example, may register low SPLs yet still be considered noisy. Prioritizing SPL reduction does not ensure improved noise perception. Therefore, a new approach is needed, one that views the hospital soundscape as a positive and malleable component of the environment. There are a number of potential sources of noise in hospitals. Alarms, televisions, rattling trolleys, and ringing phones, as well as staff, visitor, and patient conversations. However, not all of them are perceived as noise by patients – for example, some find the sound of the tea trolley pleasing, associating it with receiving a warm drink. Research has also shown that some ICU patients welcome ringing telephones as a sign that they are not alone. So far ways to measure patients’ perceptions of noise are limited, and more research investment is needed in this area. Patients and families need clear information about likely noise levels during admissions, so they are better prepared in advance, and can consider simple solutions such as headphones with their own choice of audio content. Education for staff is also needed, to encourage a culture that considers noise reduction an integral part of safe high quality healthcare.center_img Related StoriesResearch finds link between air pollution and coronary heart disease in ChinaLiving environment, air pollution may be linked to increased risk of hypertensionInternational tourists are more susceptible to harmful effects of air pollution”Measures to tackle this problem have included ear plugs, noise warning systems, acoustic treatment panels, educational initiatives and noise reduction protocols, which have provided some benefit,” said Andreas.”However, so far, patients have been seen as passive recipients of hospital noise rather than active participants in its creation. It is essential that future solutions should have greater patient participation as a key feature.”Guides about potential ward sounds could also enhance patients’ understanding of their surroundings and increase relaxation. Sound masking – the addition of background, broadband sound optimized for particular environments to reduce noise-induced disturbance – has also been used widely in open-plan offices for many years and has recently shown promise for improving sleep in hospitals.”last_img read more

Duration of thrombectomies proves crucial in success of the procedure

first_img Source:http://www.musc.edu/ Reviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Apr 15 2019The “Stroke Belt” refers to the swath of states in the Southeast where rates of stroke death are high, and according to the Department of Health and Environmental Control, South Carolina comes in at number six for the nation’s highest rates of stroke death.A stroke occurs when blood flow to a particular area of the brain is cut off, which could be due to a clot, a blood vessel leak or the bursting of a brain aneurysm. Without enough oxygen, the cells in that part of the brain begin to die and can leave behind motor and cognitive deficits.But while a stroke can be caused by vessel blockages or bleeding into the brain, the most common form is ischemic, meaning it is caused by a clot rather than a bleed, and is responsible for 87% of all strokes, according to the National Stroke Association.Timely removal of the blockage is vital when treating a stroke, and while the acceptable time to treatment has slowly lengthened with more effective thrombectomy techniques, physicians and surgeons must still act within 24 hours of the onset of stroke. Researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) report in a recent paper in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology that the current standard of care for stroke should also factor in procedure time when considering surgical intervention.”People will try once to remove the clot,” said Ali Alawieh, M.D, Ph.D., neurosurgery researcher at MUSC who worked on the study under the direction of MUSC’s Division of Neuroendovascular Surgery Director Alejandro Spiotta, M.D. “They’ll then try two, three and even four times or more hoping for a successful attempt. The idea of the paper is to quantify that, to look for a limit where you start doing more harm than good.”By studying the number of attempts and the amount of time spent performing procedures, this team of researchers concluded that the likelihood of completing an endovascular thrombectomy without significantly increasing the risk for the patient decreases dramatically after the first 30-60 minutes, depending on the technique used.Endovascular thrombectomies are performed using either stent retrievers or aspiration thrombectomy (ADAPT). By comparing both techniques, Alawieh and Spiotta found that the most important detail to consider was the time spent manipulating the vessel. Conducting the procedure with an SR means it takes the surgeon longer to get to the vessel than with ADAPT, but the factor that influences patient outcomes is the amount of time needed once the surgical team reaches the clot. Using SRs, the golden time for the procedure is at the hour mark, and using ADAPT, it is a half-hour.Related StoriesResearchers report how a popular antidepressant drug could rewire the brainSugary drinks linked to cancer finds studyNew protein target for deadly ovarian cancer”We had noticed this trend at MUSC, but we wanted to know if it extended nationally,” said Alawieh. “As it turns out, it does. After that 30- to 60-minute mark, depending on the procedure, surgeons should pause and reassess if the procedure is worth continuing.”Prior studies have shown that extending the duration of mechanical thrombectomies past 60 minutes, and more recently past 35 minutes, decreases the chance a patient will show few-to-no neurological disabilities after 90 days and increases the chance of a postprocedural hemorrhage. This study supports those findings at a multicenter national level and shows complication rates increase by the minute and were not dependent on the treatment center.Because they are in the Stroke Belt, physicians at MUSC perform some of the largest numbers of endovascular thrombectomies in the country, totaling over 200 procedures a year. Endovascular thrombectomy remains an important area of study with guidelines changing every year, and surgical teams at MUSC have already begun contributing to and incorporating the new guidelines into their surgeries.If a procedure is taking longer than the intended 30 to 60 minutes and a surgeon decides not to continue with the endovascular thrombectomy, the patient will be treated using medical intervention. While rates of positive outcomes are highest with successful surgical intervention, patients may still recover some of the deficits with medical management.This work involved a collaboration between MUSC and other centers across the country who are part of the Stroke Thrombectomy and Aneurysm Registry (STAR), a collaborative effort coordinated and initiated by MUSC to monitor outcomes in stroke patients nationally. To date, there are more than 12 centers across the U.S.”Stroke intervention procedures have improved dramatically in recent years, and they are so effective in helping patients, that it’s difficult for the physician to give up on a procedure when it’s not successful,” said Spiotta. “The major impact of this work is that it provides a potential stopping point for surgeons where the procedure can cause more harm than good.”last_img read more

San Francisco set to ban sales of ecigarettes

first_img This article was reprinted from khn.org with permission from the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. Kaiser Health News, an editorially independent news service, is a program of the Kaiser Family Foundation, a nonpartisan health care policy research organization unaffiliated with Kaiser Permanente. Reviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Jun 25 2019 San Francisco’s Board of Supervisors is slated to vote Tuesday to ban the sale and distribution of e-cigarettes in the city. The city is the corporate home of Juul Labs, the biggest producer of e-cigarettes in the country.The ordinances would make the sale of e-cigarettes illegal in brick-and-mortar stores and online when shipping to San Francisco addresses.San Francisco Mayor London Breed has 10 days to sign the legislation, which she has said she will do. The law will be enforced seven months from that date, in early 2020.San Francisco Supervisor Shamann Walton, who co-authored the legislation, sees it as part of a long-term battle against the effects of smoking.”We spent a few decades fighting big tobacco in the form of cigarettes,” Walton said. “Now we have to do it again in the form of e-cigarettes.”Under federal law, the minimum age to buy tobacco products is 18.  California and 15 other states, however, have raised that age to 21 or passed measures that will set it to 21 by 2021. Despite this, use of e-cigarettes, or vaping, has skyrocketed among teenagers nationally.Last year, 1 in 5 high school seniors reported vaping in the past month. That’s almost double the number from the year before. Even eighth graders are vaping in record numbers.These increases come after years of declines in teenagers smoking traditional cigarettes.Public health officials are concerned about the rising number of teenagers using e-cigarettes, as nicotine can harm a young person’s developing brain. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warns that young people who vape may be more likely to start smoking traditional cigarettes.Walton said he’s disgusted with the actions of Juul and similar companies, who he said are “putting profits before the health of young people, and people in general.”Despite the tobacco age limit, Walton noted that vaping devices are commonly confiscated from students in the city’s middle and high schools.The ordinance is accompanied by another that prevents the manufacture, distribution and sale of e-cigarettes on San Francisco property. The ordinance takes direct aim at Juul Labs, which leases space from the city on San Francisco’s Pier 70. The ordinance is not retroactive, so it would not remove Juul from the company’s current space, but it would prevent other e-cigarette makers from renting city property in the future. In a statement, Juul spokesman Ted Kwong wrote that, regardless, the company does not “manufacture, distribute or sell our product from this space.”Juul’s vaping device was introduced in 2015. It’s small, sleek and discreet, looking similar to a flash drive. The company now controls 70% of the vaping market.In a statement, Juul Labs said it shares the city’s goal of keeping e-cigarettes away from young people. The company said it has made it harder for underage buyers to purchase Juul off its website and has shut down Juul accounts on Facebook and Instagram.Related StoriesStudies show no evidence of fall in cigarette consumption due to WHO’s FCTCStudy finds increase in cigarette smoking among minority teens after college affirmative action bansCollege affirmative action bans may increase smoking rates among minority high school studentsBut, the company argues that “the prohibition of vapor products for all adults in San Francisco will not effectively address underage use and will leave cigarettes on shelves as the only choice for adult smokers, even though they kill 40,000 Californians every year.”Walton doesn’t buy that argument, however. He said that’s simply “trading one nicotine addiction for another.” What’s more, he’s concerned that for every adult that might benefit, dozens of young people could become addicted.San Francisco resident Jay Friedman said the complete e-cigarette ban goes too far. The software engineer smoked a pack of cigarettes a day for 20 years, and smoking e-cigarettes has reduced his regular cigarette habit to two to three a day. He said he feels better physically.Friedman supported a ban on flavored tobacco that city voters passed last year. “I feel like it was good to get rid of the fruit flavors for kids,” he said, “but this feels like maybe a step too far.”If e-cigarettes are banned, he said, he would try to quit nicotine altogether. But, “there would be a point in a moment of weakness where I’d just end up buying a pack of smokes again and then it’s just a slippery slope from there.”Small businesses in San Francisco are concerned the ban will hurt their bottom line.Miriam Zouzounis and her family own Ted’s Market, a convenience store near downtown San Francisco. She said e-cigarettes are an “anchor” product: They draw people into the store.”When people come and want to purchase something at the store and we don’t have that exact item that they want, they’re not going to buy the rest of the items that they might on that trip: a drink or a sandwich,” Zouzounis said.She said sales from e-cigarettes account for at least $200 to $300 a day in sales. As a board member of the Arab American Grocers Association, she said she believes laws like this mostly affect businesses owned by immigrants.Abbey Chaitin is a 15-year-old lifelong San Francisco resident. She isn’t drawn to using e-cigarettes, she said, because she has seen peers become addicted to them.”I’ll see them in class fidgeting,” Chaitin said. “They need it to focus, to function.”And Chaitin predicted that, regardless of a ban, young people will still get their hands on e-cigarettes: “People my age can find a way around that if they really need to,” she said.Meanwhile, Juul is collecting signatures for a November ballot initiative to override the ban.This story is part of a partnership that includes KQED, NPR and Kaiser Health News, an editorially independent program of the Kaiser Family Foundation.last_img read more

High prevalence of multiresistant intestinal bacteria in Vietnamese hospitals

first_imgRelated StoriesNew methods to recognize antimicrobial resistant bacteria and how they workNon-pathogenic bacteria engineered as Trojan Horse to treat tumors from withinRaw meat can act as reservoir for bacteria associated with hospital infectionsThe researchers conclude that there is an epidemic spread of multiresistant intestinal bacteria in Vietnamese hospitals with rapid transmission to hospitalized patients.”The extensive spread of carbapenem-resistant intestinal bacteria means that forceful measures must be taken to reduce the transmission of infection in hospitals, by improvements to hand hygiene, the use of sterile working methods during surgery and when handling venous catheters, and by isolating patients who have been affected by multiresistant intestinal bacteria. It is also important to have effective follow up when patients are discharged from hospital, in order to reduce the spread of these bacteria in the population. But even if we do everything right, it will take a long time to get infections down to an acceptably low level”, says Håkan Hanberger.In the case of Sweden, the presence of carbapenem-resistant bacteria so far is extremely low.”Sweden is one of the countries in the world where the situation with respect to carbapenem-resistant intestinal bacteria is most favorable. It is one of the countries that can probably delay the spread the longest, but we must improve hygiene in the healthcare services also in Sweden”, says Håkan Hanberger.The study has received support from, among other bodies, Karolinska Institutet, Linköping University, Region östergötland, the Swedish Foundation for International Cooperation in Research and Higher Education (STINT), ReAct – Action on Antibiotic Resistance, and the participating hospitals. Source:Linköping UniversityJournal reference:Tran, D M. et al. (2019) High prevalence of colonisation with carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae among patients admitted to Vietnamese hospitals: Risk factors and burden of disease. Journal of Infection. doi.org/10.1016/j.jinf.2019.05.013 The sub-study looked at the most vulnerable patients, new-born children who needed intensive care, and showed that mortality was five times higher in those who had a hospital-acquired infection and were carriers of the multiresistant CRE bacteria.”Håkan Hanberger, Professor, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jun 26 2019Around half of patients admitted to hospital in Vietnam are carriers of multiresistant intestinal bacteria, which are resistant to carbapenems, a group of broad-spectrum antibiotics. This is the conclusion of a study by Swedish and Vietnamese scientists led by Linköping University, published in the Journal of Infection.”In our study, we see a high prevalence of multiresistant intestinal bacteria in Vietnamese hospitals. The longer the patients are in hospital, the greater is the risk that they have been infected by intestinal bacteria resistant to carbapenems”, says Håkan Hanberger, professor in the Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine at Linköping University and consultant in the Infection Clinic at Linköping University Hospital.There are several reasons why carbapenem-resistant enterobacteriaceae (CRE) are a serious problem. They are resistant to nearly all broad-spectrum antibiotics, which means that infections caused by these bacteria are difficult to treat. In addition, CRE can pass antibiotic-resistance genes to other bacteria, causing these to become resistant to the carbapenem group of antibiotics. Intestinal bacteria spread easily, such as on hands and furniture used in the care of infants. They cause various types of infection, primarily urinary tract infections, sepsis and pneumonia. These multiresistant intestinal bacteria are spreading rapidly around the world, and WHO has given the highest priority to measures to control the spread of CRE and to develop new antibiotics against these bacteria.The study reported in the Journal of Infection included more than 2,200 patients admitted to 63 different wards at 12 hospitals in various parts of Vietnam. Rectal swabs were taken from the patients and investigated for the presence of CRE. Being a carrier is a risk factor for contracting a clinical infection with the bacteria, but not all carriers become sick.Risk factors for becoming a carrier of multiresistant intestinal bacteria were a longer stay in the hospital and contracting an infection during the stay, known as a “hospital-acquired infection”. One of eight patients (13%) were carriers at admission, which had increased to seven of eight patients (87%) after two weeks in hospital. Another risk factor for patients in the study was being treated with carbapenem, which contributes to the carbapenem-resistant bacteria being selected.In a sub-study of 328 new-born children in a neonatal intensive care unit, the scientists showed that mortality is linked to being a carrier for CRE and to having a hospital-acquired infection when admitted to the unit (odds ratio 5.5, p<0.01).last_img read more

UK lawmaker Facebook misled Parliament over data leak risk

Citation: UK lawmaker: Facebook misled Parliament over data leak risk (2018, March 18) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-03-uk-lawmaker-facebook-misled-parliament.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore further © 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. Facebook accused of inaction over Russian ads in Brexit vote A British lawmaker accused Facebook on Sunday of misleading officials by downplaying the risk of users’ data being shared without their consent, after a former employee of data firm Cambridge Analytica says his company harvested information from 50 million Facebook users. Conservative legislator Damian Collins, who heads the British Parliament’s media committee, said he would ask Facebook chief Mark Zuckerberg or another Facebook executive to appear before his panel, which is investigating disinformation and “fake news.”Collins said Facebook has “consistently understated” the risk of data leaks and gave misleading answers to the committee.”Someone has to take responsibility for this,” he said. “It’s time for Mark Zuckerberg to stop hiding behind his Facebook page.”Collins also accused the head of the U.K.-based data firm Cambridge Analytica, Alexander Nix, of lying. Nix told the committee last month that his firm had not received data from a researcher accused of obtaining millions of Facebook users’ personal information.Facebook suspended Cambridge Analytica, which is best known for working on President Donald Trump’s 2016 campaign, on Friday over allegations it retained improperly obtained user data after claiming it had deleted the information.Former Cambridge Analytica employee Chris Wylie said that the company obtained information from 50 million Facebook users, using it to build psychological profiles so voters could be targeted with ads and stories.Wylie told Britain’s Channel 4 news that the company was able to amass a huge database very quickly from an app developed by an academic that vacuumed up data from Facebook users who agreed to fill out a survey, as well as their friends and contacts—a process of which most were unaware.”Imagine I go and ask you: I say, ‘Hey, if I give you a dollar, two dollars, could you fill up this survey for me, just do it on this app’, and you say, ‘Fine,'” He said. “I don’t just capture what your responses are, I capture all of the information about you from Facebook. But also this app then crawls through your social network and captures all of that data also.”Wylie said that allowed the company to get roughly “50 million plus” Facebook records in several months and he criticized Facebook for facilitating the process.”Why Facebook didn’t make more inquiries when they started seeing that, you know, tens of millions of records were being pulled this way, I don’t know,” he said.Lawmaker Collins said he would summon Nix to reappear before the Parliament committee.”It seems clear that he has deliberately misled the committee and Parliament by giving false statements,” Collins said. read more

Pedal power the rise of cargo bikes in Germany

Florists, chimneysweepsBut the “workhorse of the 21st century”, as the Frankfurter Rundschau newspaper dubbed it, has yet to win over the masses.Just one percent of Germans own a cargo bike, a study released by the transport ministry in March found—although seven percent said they considered buying one.Becker believes this will change “in the next few years”. “First people need to be able to try it out” without spending 1,300 to 5,000 euros ($1,500-$6000) depending on the model, she said.Keen to promote the climate-friendly cargo bikes, several initiatives have emerged to lend them to companies and individuals for free trials. Last year, German firm Velogut began loaning them out to 150 companies in Berlin.Among the sign-ups have been photographers, coffee and pastry vendors, florists, chimneysweeps, beekeepers, Christmas tree deliverers and even a travelling anaesthetist.The federal government has also got in on the act by introducing a rebate of up to 2,500 euros for the purchase of an e-cargo bike with a load of more than 150 kilos, while Berlin authorities offer subsidies of 500 to 1,000 euros. Explore further Today Germany is Europe’s largest market for cargo bikes in terms of volume—with industry data showing sales for electrically assisted cargo bikes alone surged to 21,000 in 2017, 42 percent over the previous year ‘Protect us’But experts say the biggest roadblock to cargo bikes going mainstream is the lack of adapted infrastructure: safe cycle lanes, secure parking and easy-to-find repair shops.”If they want clean air, they have to protect us,” said Antje Merschel, co-initiator of a recent Berlin referendum on cycling policies.”We’re not going to risk our lives on a bike.”Online retailer Amazon has started using cargo bikes for deliveries, while shipping giant UPS has been running battery-powered freight bikes in German cities since 2012.But the big players in delivery are still waiting for bike manufacturers to catch up and mass-produce reliable low-maintainance models, which are so far mostly made by small, independent companies.There is also the complication of needing “micro-hubs” in often high-rent urban areas from where couriers can collect trucked-in goods for the final kilometres to the client’s front door.”For families, the bikes are here and they’re reliable,” said urban planner Francisco Luciano of the French cargo bike manufacturer Douze Cycles. “When it comes to cycle logistics, we’re still learning.” Bike-share companies are transforming US cities – and they’re just getting started Today Germany is Europe’s largest market for cargo bikes in terms of volume—with industry data showing sales for electrically assisted cargo bikes alone surged to 21,000 in 2017, 42 percent over the previous year.No sweatOver the years, cargo bikes have evolved from bulky two-wheelers that required serious leg muscle. Modern upgrades offer lighter frames and more spacious carriers, while e-cargo bikes have allowed the less physically active or those living in hilly areas to also jump in the saddle.Cargo bikes “now reach a wider audience, people who don’t want to arrive at work sweaty or aren’t especially sporty,” said Sophia Becker, a researcher at the Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies (IASS) in Potsdam near Berlin.According to the European CycleLogistics project, a staggering 174 models of cargo bikes are now available, while some 50 brands vied for attention at Berlin’s International Cargo Bike Festival in April. Citation: Pedal power: the rise of cargo bikes in Germany (2018, May 2) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-05-power-cargo-bikes-germany.html © 2018 AFP A desire to go green has been key to the rise of cargo bikes in a country where dozens of smog-choked cities are considering diesel driving bans to combat air pollution.”The diesel scandal is a major incentive,” said Arne Behrensen, one of the top promotors of cargo bikes in Germany, a mode of transport as old as the bicycle itself which refers to a two- or three-wheeled bike with a fixed load carrier, usually at the front.Financial incentives, more choice in models and the promise of zipping past rush-hour traffic in the bike lane have added to the appeal.”In the ’90s, we were happy to sell one a year,” said Gaya Schuetze of Berlin’s Mehringhof bicycle shop, one of the capital’s leading cargo bike centres.”Then we noticed more and more interest, first from families and then companies.”Commonplace in northern Europe until the mid-20th century, freight bikes were used to deliver everyday essentials such as milk, bread and newspapers.But these heavy, unwieldy bikes quickly fell out of favour and into oblivion as motorised vehicles gained ground.The cargo bike’s revival began some two decades ago in cycling-mad Denmark and the Netherlands, blessed with flat landscapes and comfortable bike lanes, before reaching Germany. Modern cargo bikes offer lighter frames and more spacious carriers, while electrically assisted ones allow the less physically active or those living in hilly areas to also jump in the saddle Whether they’re hauling parcels or children, cargo bikes are becoming a familiar sight in German cities as the nippy, clean alternative to cars and delivery vans—and shaking up urban transport in the process. Industry observers say the cargo bike craze has yet to run its course because “they can handle situations where a car previously seemed indispensable”, says Becker.”In an average European city, half of all motorised trips related to goods transport could be shifted to bicycle or cargo bikes,” Karl Reiter of the CycleLogistics project calculated in a 2014 study, based on journeys of a maximum of seven kilometres (4.3 miles) with loads of less than 200 kilos (440 pounds). Experts say the biggest roadblock to cargo bikes going mainstream is the lack of adapted infrastructure: safe cycle lanes, secure parking and easy-to-find repair shops The cargo bike craze has yet to run its course because “they can handle situations where a car previously seemed indispensable,” says green researcher Sophia Becker This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. read more

Russian tech giant dashes hopes for smartphone

first_img © 2018 AFP Yandex instead announced a new smart speaker that uses the voice of “Alisa”—a virtual assistant similar to Amazon’s Alexa Speculation has been mounting for years that Yandex—which dominates internet services in Russia—will put forward its own mobile device to rival giants like Apple, Samsung and Huawei.Excitement reached fever pitch when Yandex announced it would be holding a presentation at its glossy Moscow headquarters, with Russian media reports anticipating a smartphone launch that would be a major step for the company.But Yandex instead announced a new smart speaker that uses the voice of “Alisa”—a virtual assistant similar to Amazon’s Alexa—that will cost around 40 euros.Asked by disappointed journalists about the potential smartphone, Yandex representatives said only: “We are not commenting on this question.”Yandex started in the 1990s as a search engine similar to Google but has since expanded into every corner of the Russian internet, developing maps, taxi and food order apps that Russians use every day.A Russian-designed smartphone—the YotaPhone—was launched in 2013 but has failed to catch on and tech observers have been waiting anxiously for Yandex to jump into the field.Tom Morrod, research director at IHS Markit, said that once Yandex does enter the market it will likely be with a mid-range option aimed at supporting its services.”Non-hardware companies are often happy to take a mid-market position, without hoping to make money. Yandex’s smartphone would likely run on Android but they would put their own environment on it, with all their apps that you probably will not be able to delete,” he said. “It’s about getting people locked into their ecosystem, collect data and advertise,” he added. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Citation: Russian tech giant dashes hopes for smartphone (2018, November 19) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-11-russian-tech-giant-dashes-smartphone.htmlcenter_img Russian search engine alerts Google to possible data problem Russian internet giant Yandex disappointed tech enthusiasts on Monday by failing to unveil what many hoped would be a highly anticipated Russian-made smartphone. Explore furtherlast_img read more

Amazon Prime Day Best Deals for Science Lovers

first_imgAmazon’s annual Prime Day will deliver savings on thousands of products for Prime members today (July 16). Live Science is wading through these products so you don’t have to, bringing you the nerdiest picks: from microscope slide collections to DIY robots; from chemistry sets to molecule jewelry. For all you science geeks out there, here’s a look at what we’re watching right now. We will be updating this page throughout the day with our favorite science-y deals. Dinosaur PuppetsHeadbutting Tiny Worms Are Really, Really LoudThis rapid strike produces a loud ‘pop’ comparable to those made by snapping shrimps, one of the most intense biological sounds measured at sea.Your Recommended PlaylistVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9接下来播放Why Is It ‘Snowing’ Salt in the Dead Sea?01:53 facebook twitter 发邮件 reddit 链接https://www.livescience.com/59741-amazon-prime-day-science-deals.html?jwsource=cl已复制直播00:0000:3500:35  Rawr! Stage epic Jurassic battles with three colorful dinosaur head puppets. Though real dinosaurs were feathered, these heads of extinct carnivorous dinosaurs such at T. rex and Velociraptor are made of soft, painted silicon. Prime Day price: $18.95, a savings of 20% for Prime members Buy Dinosaur Puppets on Amazon.com Anatomy Apron Instead of wearing your heart on your sleeve, why not wear it on an apron — along with your lungs, liver, intestines and other organs? Soft sculptures in polyester and cotton offer an external view of the organs in the human body, assembled in their correct positions. Prime Day price: $17.99, a savings of 40% for Prime members Buy Anatomy Apron on Amazon.com Newton’s Cradle Enjoy a mesmerizing desktop display of physics in action, with a device known as Newton’s Cradle. The swinging motion of the stainless steel balls demonstrates conservation of momentum and energy as the balls at the end of the row transmit force through the rest of the spheres. Prime Day price: $12.79, a savings of 20% for Prime members Buy Newton’s Cradle on Amazon.com Shark Night Light Sharks usually cruise unseen in the dark ocean depths, but this 3D illuminated shark lamp will light up the darkness of your room. The LED light cycles through seven colors and is powered by USB or 3 AA batteries (not included). Prime Day price: $13.19, a savings of 20% for Prime members Buy 3D Shark Night Light on Amazon.com Prepared Human Pathology Slide Set These 12 research-quality slides are a superb educational tool for introducing students to the effects of disease on the human body. They contain tissue samples representing a range of human pathologies, including anaemia, tuberculosis, cancer, fibroma and tumors. Prime Day price: $40.00, a savings of 20% for Prime members Buy Human Pathology Slide Set on Amazon.com Inflatable Stegosaurus Costume This inflatable costume will transform you into the stegosaurus you’ve always wanted to be. The costume is 100% polyester and is best suited for people of heights between 4 feet 9 inches (1.5 meters) and six feet two inches (1.9 m) tall. Included with the costume is fan for inflation, which requires 4 AA batteries (not included). Prime Day price: $35.19, a savings of 20% for Prime members Buy Dinosaur Costume on Amazon.com Over-Glasses Safety Goggles Just because you wear prescriptions glasses doesn’t mean you have to compromise safety during your experiments. These durable, scratch-resistant safety goggles will fit comfortably over your glasses, offering protection against splattering liquids or airborne particles. They also filter out 99% of UV light. Prime Day price: $8.52, a savings of 20% for Prime members Buy Safety Goggles on Amazon.com National Geographic Birds Field Guide Get to know your feathered neighbors with the “National Geographic Field Guide to the Birds of North America,” the most up-to-date guide available. Beautifully illustrated and packed with information to thrill and delight birdwatchers of all levels, the book describes more than 1,000 species of birds. Prime Day price: $16.32, a savings of 46% for Prime members. Take an additional $5 off the price with promo code PRIMEBOOK19 when spending $15 or more on books offered by Amazon.com. Buy Nat Geo Bird Guide on Amazon.com Caffeine Necklace Show the world how much you love coffee on a molecular level, with this metal alloy necklace that shows coffee’s chemical structure. Also available in silver, gold and rose gold tones. Prime Day price: $11.85, a savings of 25% for Prime members Buy Caffeine Necklace on Amazon.com Nicola Tesla Patents Art Prints Celebrate the genius of pioneering engineer and thinker Nicola Tesla with a set of six art prints depicting some of his most celebrated inventions, including an electromagnet motor, an electric incandescent lamp and an alternative electric current generator. Prime Day price: $11.24, a savings of 25% for Prime members Buy Tesla Patents Prints on Amazon.com Hummingbird Feeder If hummingbirds are native to the region where you live, you can attract them to your backyard with this easy-to-assemble hummingbird feeder. It can hold 12 ounces (0.4 liters) of nectar and has four feeding stations, and it can be suspended from a pole, pillar or branch. Prime Day price: $10.87, a savings of 36% for Prime members Buy Hummingbird Feeder on Amazon.com Math Formula Wall Clock Math nerds will delight in keeping time with this silent, battery-operated wall clock, which displays math equations to mark the hours. It measures 12 inches (31 centimeters) in diameter and requires one AA battery (not included). Prime Day price: $19.74, a savings of 21% for Prime members Buy Math Formula Wall Clock on Amazon.com Moon Lamp Now you can experience the full moon whenever you like, with a spherical lamp modeled to resemble the lunar surface. The lamp features 16 colors and 4 display modes, which can be adjusted by touch or by remote control, and it will remain illuminated for 6 to 12 hours at a time, depending on the brightness setting. Prime Day price: $18.49, a savings of 26% for Prime members Buy Moon Lamp on Amazon.com Microscope Slide Collection A diverse array of microscopic tissue samples representing plants and animals are at your fingertips, in this 48-pack microscope slide collection. These high-transparency prepared plastic slides are clearly labeled and will provide hours of fascination and discovery for curious minds with a microscope. Prime Day price: $9.80, a 51% savings for Prime members Buy Microscope Slides on Amazon.com Serotonin Molecule Sterling Silver Necklace Serotonin is a neurotransmitter associated with the regulation of mood, sleep patterns and appetite, and is thought to contribute to feelings of happiness. With this serotonin molecule necklace, you can carry a little happiness with you wherever you go. Prime Day price: $18.39, a savings of 20% for Prime members Buy Serotonin Necklace on Amazon.com Boom! Combustion Chemistry Kit Who could resist the chance to make something go boom? This kit includes everything an aspiring chemist will need to make colorful expanding liquids; to launch rockets and geysers; and to generate explosive sounds and sparkle effects. Recommended for ages 8 (with adult supervision) and up. Prime Day price: $36.58, Prime members save an additional 20% at checkout Buy Boom! Chemistry Kit on Amazon.com Men’s Science Socks Put your best foot forward (and by “best” we mean “nerdiest”) with these colorful socks, decorated with atoms, beakers, microscopes, and other science symbols. Prime Day price: $8.79, a savings of 20% for Prime members Buy Men’s Science Socks on Amazon.com Assorted Science Decals Declare your nerdiness to the world by plastering these science decals on everything you own. Each pack contains 50 unique designs that are fade-resistant and waterproof, each measuring around 2 to 3 inches (6 to 8 centimeters) wide. Prime Day price: $5.59, a savings of 20% for Prime members Buy Assorted Science Decals on Amazon.com Originally published on Live Science.by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeDugiFeedThis Is What Will Happen When You Eat Bananas Every DayDugiFeedUndoBrilliant Future10 Worst Paying College MajorsBrilliant FutureUndoMy Daily DiscoveryHow To Keep Your Photos And Videos SafeMy Daily DiscoveryUndoThe SideHairstyles That Make You Look Younger Than EverThe SideUndoeasyrecipes20 Toughest Restaurants Worldwide To Get A Reservation (But Worth The Wait)easyrecipesUndoYour Health7 Natural Pain Relief TechniquesYour HealthUndolast_img read more